IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/uitcoe/15868.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Free Trade Agreements Between Developing and Industrialized Countries: Comparing the U.S.-Jordan FTA with Mexico's Experience Under NAFTA

Author

Listed:
  • Chomo, Grace V.

Abstract

Developing countries are participating in bilateral and multilateral trade agreements in record numbers. Despite their eagerness to improve market access, fears remain that trade liberalization with large industrialized nations will erode infant industrial sectors, hindering the process of economic development. Empirical evidence from the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) between the United States, Canada, and Mexico has not supported fears that trade liberalization with industrialized nations slows economic development in less-developed countries. NAFTA trade flows and foreign direct investment into Mexico expanded at a greater rate following NAFTA implementation, taking into account real exchange rate changes and capital flight during the 1995 peso crisis. Like Mexico, Jordan's improved access to the large U.S. market is expected to increase opportunities for Jordanian exports, attract foreign investment, and stimulate economic development with trade as the engine of growth. This study compares and contrasts Mexico's experience under NAFTA with Jordan's potential under the U.S.- Jordan Free Trade Agreement.

Suggested Citation

  • Chomo, Grace V., 2002. "Free Trade Agreements Between Developing and Industrialized Countries: Comparing the U.S.-Jordan FTA with Mexico's Experience Under NAFTA," Working Papers 15868, United States International Trade Commission, Office of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uitcoe:15868
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/15868
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Patrick J. Kehoe & Timothy J. Kehoe, 1994. "Capturing NAFTA's impact with applied general equilibrium models," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Spr, pages 17-34.
    2. Nora Lustig, 2001. "Life Is Not Easy: Mexico's Quest for Stability and Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(1), pages 85-106, Winter.
    3. Tobey, James A. & Chomo, G.V., 1994. "Resource supplies and changing world agricultural comparative advantage," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 10(3), May.
    4. Anne O. Krueger, 2000. "NAFTA's Effects: A Preliminary Assessment," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(6), pages 761-775, June.
    5. Thomas Vollrath, 1991. "A theoretical evaluation of alternative trade intensity measures of revealed comparative advantage," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 127(2), pages 265-280, June.
    6. David H. Romer & Jeffrey A. Frankel, 1999. "Does Trade Cause Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 379-399, June.
    7. Tobey, James A. & Chomo, G. V., 1994. "Resource supplies and changing world agricultural comparative advantage," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 10(3), pages 207-217, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Awad. T., 2012. "Trade Liberalization Policy And Growth By Sector: Is It Working For Jordan?," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 12(2).
    2. Adagblenya, Barbara Dzidzornu, 2017. "Assessing Ghana’s trade under the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA)," MPRA Paper 84255, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    International Relations/Trade;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:uitcoe:15868. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/itcgvus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.