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Diversifikation und Arbeitszufriedenheit – trifft die These von Marx und Engels auf Landwirte zu?

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  • Mann, Stefan
  • Besser, Tim

Abstract

In den herkömmlichen Wirtschaftswissenschaften wurde viel Energie darauf verwendet, die Effizienzgewinne der Spezialisierung nachzuweisen, auch im Agrarsektor. Während die These von Marx und Engels, wonach die Diversifikation unseres Arbeitslebens unsere Arbeitszufriedenheit erhöhen würde, in den Sozialwissenschaft durchaus Aufmerksamkeit erzeugt wurde, wurde diese These für den Agrarsektor nie verifiziert, ungeachtet einer anwachsenden Literatur zu den Determinanten der Arbeitszufriedenheit. Dieser Beitrag nützt eine Umfrage unter schweizerischen und nordostdeutschen Landwirten, um zu zeigen, dass betriebliche Diversifikation die Arbeitszufriedenheit signifikant erhöht. Dies trifft auf die Anzahl der Produktlinien auf einem Landwirtschaftsbetrieb zu, aber auch auf nichtlandwirtschaftliche Aktivitäten auf dem Betrieb.

Suggested Citation

  • Mann, Stefan & Besser, Tim, 2016. "Diversifikation und Arbeitszufriedenheit – trifft die These von Marx und Engels auf Landwirte zu?," 56th Annual Conference, Bonn, Germany, September 28-30, 2016 244808, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:gewi16:244808
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.244808
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Easterlin, Richard A, 2001. "Income and Happiness: Towards an Unified Theory," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(473), pages 465-484, July.
    2. Stefan Mann, 2007. "Tracing the process of becoming a farm successor on Swiss family farms," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 24(4), pages 435-443, December.
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    Consumer/Household Economics; Farm Management;

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