IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Do Tenure Differences Influence the Improvement of Quality of Rented Land? Empirical Evidence from Rural Ghana


  • Owusu, Victor
  • Gunning, Jan Willem
  • Burger, Kees


The implications of migrant agricultural production for the environment have interested policy makers in sub-Saharan Africa of late. The impacts in the region of migrant destination may be short-term including initial felling of trees, intensive land use, and application of techniques. In the longer term, tenants are expected to adjust their techniques to that of the indigenous landowners. This paper explains how migrant tenants manage the quality of rented plots in the absence of clearly defined property rights with a survey data from rural area in Ghana. An empirical model explaining the probability to invest in land improvements is formulated. The empirical results indicate that tenure differences and income levels of migrants and indigenous landowners play a critical role in investments in land improvements.

Suggested Citation

  • Owusu, Victor & Gunning, Jan Willem & Burger, Kees, 2007. "Do Tenure Differences Influence the Improvement of Quality of Rented Land? Empirical Evidence from Rural Ghana," 106th Seminar, October 25-27, 2007, Montpellier, France 7933, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaa106:7933

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Clay, Daniel C. & Byiringiro, Fidele Usabuwera & Kangasniemi, Jaakko & Reardon, Thomas & Sibomana, Bosco & Uwamariya, Laurence & Tardif-Douglin, David, 1995. "Promoting Food Security in Rwanda Through Sustainable Agricultural Productivity: Meeting the Challenges of Population Pressure, Land Degradation, and Poverty," Food Security International Development Papers 54054, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    2. S. Illeris & G. Akehurst, 2001. "Introduction," The Service Industries Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(1), pages 1-4, January.
    3. Lopez, Ramon, 1997. "Environmental externalities in traditional agriculture and the impact of trade liberalization: the case of Ghana," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 17-39, June.
    4. Besley, Timothy, 1995. "Property Rights and Investment Incentives: Theory and Evidence from Ghana," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(5), pages 903-937, October.
    5. Angelsen, Arild, 1999. "Agricultural expansion and deforestation: modelling the impact of population, market forces and property rights," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 185-218, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    Land Economics/Use;


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:eaa106:7933. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.