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Exogenous Production Shocks And Technical Efficiency Among Traditional Ivorien Rice Farmers

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  • Sherlund, Shane M.
  • Barrett, Christopher B.

Abstract

This paper uses a unique panel data set and data envelopment analysis (DEA) to obtain estimates of technical efficiency for 492 traditional rice plots in Côte d'Ivoire. The objective of this paper is to explore the importance of explicitly controlling for exogenous shocks to production in technical efficiency estimation. We show how omission of such variables in highly stochastic production environments can lead to serious inferential errors, with potentially significant policy implications. Conventional DEA estimation of a production frontier, followed by second-stage Tobit estimation of the correlates of plot- level technical efficiency, suggest widespread and substantial inefficiency related to crop fragmentation and seed varieties. However, when one controls for unobserved groupwise cross-sectional and intertemporal heterogeneity and introduces measurable exogenous shocks into the second-stage estimation, managerial characteristics become jointly insignificant and state-conditional technical efficiency becomes nearly universal. The implication is that conventional technical efficiency estimates that refute the classic Schultzian "poor but efficient" hypothesis may be incorrect because they ignore farmers' vulnerability to adverse states of nature against which they cannot insure.

Suggested Citation

  • Sherlund, Shane M. & Barrett, Christopher B., 1998. "Exogenous Production Shocks And Technical Efficiency Among Traditional Ivorien Rice Farmers," 1998 Annual meeting, August 2-5, Salt Lake City, UT 20945, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea98:20945
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/20945
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Meeusen, Wim & van den Broeck, Julien, 1977. "Efficiency Estimation from Cobb-Douglas Production Functions with Composed Error," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 18(2), pages 435-444, June.
    2. Aigner, Dennis & Lovell, C. A. Knox & Schmidt, Peter, 1977. "Formulation and estimation of stochastic frontier production function models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 21-37, July.
    3. Christpher B. Barrett, 1997. "How credible are estimates of peasant allocative scale, or scope efficiency? A commentary," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(2), pages 221-229.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sherlund, Shane M. & Barrett, Christopher B. & Adesina, Akinwumi A., 2002. "Smallholder technical efficiency controlling for environmental production conditions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 85-101, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Africa (Sub-Saharan); Ivory Coast; production frontiers; agricultural productivity; rice.; Crop Production/Industries; Productivity Analysis; O12; Q12; D2;

    JEL classification:

    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • D2 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations

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