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The Effect of Price and Non-Price Conservation Programs on Residential Water Demand

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  • Asci, Serhat
  • Borisova, Tatiana

Abstract

The study examines effectiveness of price- and non-price residential water demand management programs. Household-level water use data for Alachua County, Florida, were analyzed using three methods: IV, 2SLS, and 3SLS. Residential water demand is examined separately for households with combined water meters, as well as separate indoor and outdoor irrigation water meters. Preliminary results show that the price-base program (i.e., inclining block rate pricing) and non-price programs (i.e., residential irrigation restrictions with an enforcement component) have a significant effect on monthly household water use.

Suggested Citation

  • Asci, Serhat & Borisova, Tatiana, 2014. "The Effect of Price and Non-Price Conservation Programs on Residential Water Demand," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170687, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea14:170687
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.170687
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/170687/files/AsciBorisova-2014-AAEA-AlachuaWaterDemand.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Borisova, Tatiana & Useche, Pilar, 2013. "Exploring the effects of extension workshops on household water use behavior," 2013 Annual Meeting, February 2-5, 2013, Orlando, Florida 143792, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
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    5. Mary E. Renwick & Sandra O. Archibald, 1998. "Demand Side Management Policies for Residential Water Use: Who Bears the Conservation Burden?," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 74(3), pages 343-359.
    6. Ellen M. Pint, 1999. "Household Responses to Increased Water Rates during the California Drought," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 75(2), pages 246-266.
    7. Michael L. Nieswiadomy & David J. Molina, 1989. "Comparing Residential Water Demand Estimates under Decreasing and Increasing Block Rates Using Household Data," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 65(3), pages 280-289.
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    12. Donna Brennan & Sorada Tapsuwan & Gordon Ingram, 2007. "The welfare costs of urban outdoor water restrictions," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 51(3), pages 243-261, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Asci, Serhat & Borisova, Tatiana & Dukes, Michael D., 2015. "Price- and Non-Price Water Demand Management Strategies for Water Utilities," 2015 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2015, Atlanta, Georgia 196768, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    2. Havranek, Tomas & Irsova, Zuzana & Vlach, Tomas, 2016. "Publication Bias in Measuring the Income Elasticity of Water Demand," MPRA Paper 75247, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Tomas Havranek & Zuzana Irsova & Tomas Vlach, 2018. "Measuring the Income Elasticity of Water Demand: The Importance of Publication and Endogeneity Biases," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 94(2), pages 259-283.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumer/Household Economics; Demand and Price Analysis; Environmental Economics and Policy;

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