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Demand For Differentiated Vegetables

Author

Listed:
  • Yen, Steven T.
  • Lin, Biing-Hwan
  • Harris, James Michael
  • Ballenger, Nicole

Abstract

To obtain a healthier diet, Americans need to consume not only more vegetables, but also a healthier mix of vegetables. Household demands for eight categories of vegetables are investigated, using ACNielsen's Homescan data. A maximum simulated likelihood estimation procedure results in elasticity estimates which are somewhat larger than those obtained from both time-series and cross-section data in the literature. Even these larger elasticities are not large enough to bridge the dietary consumption gap without, and possibly even with, substantial price or food expenditure subsidies. Furthermore, Homescan data do indicate some significant differences in preferences for types of vegetables by household characteristics, such as race and ethnicity. This information could be used in designing more effective public interventions for boosting vegetable consumption in the United States.

Suggested Citation

  • Yen, Steven T. & Lin, Biing-Hwan & Harris, James Michael & Ballenger, Nicole, 2004. "Demand For Differentiated Vegetables," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20059, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea04:20059
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/20059/files/sp04ye01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Wales, T. J. & Woodland, A. D., 1983. "Estimation of consumer demand systems with binding non-negativity constraints," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 263-285, April.
    2. Kellie Curry Raper & Maria Namakhoye Wanzala & Rodolfo Nayga, 2002. "Food expenditures and household demographic composition in the US: a demand systems approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(8), pages 981-992.
    3. Huang, Kuo S. & Lin, Biing-Hwan, 2000. "Estimation of Food Demand Nutrient Elasticities from household Survey Data," Technical Bulletins 184370, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    4. Huang, Kuo S. & Lin, Biing-Hwan, 2000. "Estimation Of Food Demand And Nutrient Elasticities From Household Survey Data," Technical Bulletins 33579, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    5. Lee, Lung-Fei & Pitt, Mark M, 1986. "Microeconometric Demand Systems with Binding Nonnegativity Constraints: The Dual Approach," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 54(5), pages 1237-1242, September.
    6. Feng, Xudong & Chern, Wen S., 2000. "Demand For Healthy Food In The United States," 2000 Annual meeting, July 30-August 2, Tampa, FL 21857, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    7. Buzby, Jean C. & Guthrie, Joanne F., 2004. "The USDA Fruit and Vegetable Pilot Program Evaluation," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33757, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
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