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Incentives, Inequality and the Allocation of Aid When Conditionality Doesn’t Work: An Optimal Nonlinear Taxation Approach

In: Poverty, Inequality and Development

Author

Listed:
  • Ravi Kanbur

    (Cornell University)

  • Matti Tuomala

    (University of Tampere)

Abstract

This paper analyses the impact of aid, and its optimal allocation, when conditionality is ineffective. It is assumed that the recipient government will implement its own preferences no matter what. In this set up, aid can still affect the behavior of a recipient, not through conditionality but through changing resource constraints. We analyze the problem in the tradition of models of optimal non-linear income taxation. We find that unconditional aid increases national income and makes the poor better off in the recipient country, but that there is a crowding out effect as the recipient country reduces labor supply in response to increased aid. On optimal allocation of aid across countries, we find that poorer countries should get more aid, as should countries with governments that are more inequality averse, which conforms to intuition. However, a striking finding is that more unequal countries should get less aid.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Ravi Kanbur & Matti Tuomala, 2006. "Incentives, Inequality and the Allocation of Aid When Conditionality Doesn’t Work: An Optimal Nonlinear Taxation Approach," Economic Studies in Inequality, Social Exclusion, and Well-Being, in: Alain Janvry & Ravi Kanbur (ed.), Poverty, Inequality and Development, chapter 0, pages 331-351, Springer.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:esichp:978-0-387-29748-4_16
    DOI: 10.1007/0-387-29748-0_16
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Finn Tarp, 2006. "Aid and Development," Discussion Papers 06-12, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    2. Tuomala, Matti, 1990. "Optimal Income Tax and Redistribution," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198286059.
    3. Kanbur, Ravi & Tuomala, Matti, 1994. " Inherent Inequality and the Optimal Graduation of Marginal Tax Rates," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 96(2), pages 275-282.
    4. Shantayanan Devarajan & David R. Dollar & Torgny Holmgren, 2001. "Aid and Reform in Africa : Lessons from Ten Case Studies," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 13894, November.
    5. Svensson, Jakob, 2000. "When is foreign aid policy credible? Aid dependence and conditionality," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 61-84, February.
    6. Tony Killick, 1995. "Conditionality And The Adjustment Development Connection," Pakistan Journal of Applied Economics, Applied Economics Research Centre, vol. 11, pages 17-36.
    7. David Dollar & Craig Burnside, 2000. "Aid, Policies, and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 847-868, September.
    8. Mirrlees, J. A., 1976. "Optimal tax theory : A synthesis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 327-358, November.
    9. J. A. Mirrlees, 1971. "An Exploration in the Theory of Optimum Income Taxation," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(2), pages 175-208.
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    Cited by:

    1. Viktor P. Ivanitsky & Dmitry N. Gabyshev & Larisa D. Zubkova, 2019. "Individual income tax: New opportunities for management," Upravlenets, Ural State University of Economics, vol. 10(5), pages 41-51, October.
    2. Ranis, Gustav, 2012. "Another Look at Foreign Aid," Center Discussion Papers 133408, Yale University, Economic Growth Center.
    3. Ranis, Gustav, 2012. "Another Look at Foreign Aid," Working Papers 106, Yale University, Department of Economics.
    4. Gustav Ranis, 2012. "Another Look at Foreign Aid," Working Papers 1015, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social Welfare Function; Recipient Country; Inequality Aversion; Incentive Compatibility Constraint; Recipient Government;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H21 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Efficiency; Optimal Taxation
    • O19 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations

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