IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/h/nbr/nberch/8498.html
   My bibliography  Save this book chapter

Affiliates of US and Japanese Multinationals in East Asian Production and Trade

In: The Role of Foreign Direct Investment in East Asian Economic Development

Author

Listed:
  • Robert E. Lipsey

Abstract

Since 1977, and in some cases starting before that, most East Asian countries' export patterns in manufacturing have been transformed from industry distributions typical of developing countries to distributions more like those of advanced countries. The process of change in most cases started with inward FDI to produce for export in the new industries, particularly by U.S. firms in electronics and computer-related machinery. The U.S. firms were followed, in electronics, by Japanese multinationals. Over time, in most cases, the U.S.-owned affiliates turned more to sales in host-country markets and their share in host country exports declined, although the host countries' specializations in the new industries continued. U.S. and Japanese firms played somewhat different roles. U.S. firms' investments were always distributed more along the lines of U.S. export comparative advantage, far from the previous patterns of the host countries. The industry distribution of Japanese investments initially followed more the lines of the host countries' comparative advantage and Japanese affiliates were less export-oriented than U.S. affiliates. However, Japanese affiliates have become more like U.S. affiliates in both export orientation and industry composition. Their early concentration in textiles and apparel faded and they are more heavily concentrated than U.S. affiliates and more export-oriented in both electrical machinery and transport equipment.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Robert E. Lipsey, 2000. "Affiliates of US and Japanese Multinationals in East Asian Production and Trade," NBER Chapters, in: The Role of Foreign Direct Investment in East Asian Economic Development, pages 147-189, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:8498
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c8498.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robert E. Lipsey & Irving B. Kravis, 1985. "The Competitive Position of U.S. Manufacturing Firms," NBER Working Papers 1557, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Robert E. Lipsey & Magnus Blomstrom & Eric D. Ramstetter, 1998. "Internationalized Production in World Output," NBER Chapters, in: Geography and Ownership as Bases for Economic Accounting, pages 83-138, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Magnus Blomstrom & Irving B. Kravis & Robert E. Lipsey, 1988. "Multinational Firms and Manufactured Exports from Developing Countries," NBER Working Papers 2493, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Robert E. Lipsey, 1995. "Trade and Production Networks of U.S. MNCs and Exports by Their Asian Affiliates," NBER Working Papers 5255, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. -, 2016. "The South American input-output table: Key assumptions and methodological considerations," Documentos de Proyectos 40832, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    2. Klein, Michael & Aaron, Carl & Hadjimichael, Bita, 2001. "Foreign direct investment and poverty reduction," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2613, The World Bank.
    3. Koike, Ryoji, 2004. "Japan's Foreign Direct Investment and Structural Changes in Japanese and East Asian Trade," Monetary and Economic Studies, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, vol. 22(3), pages 145-182, October.
    4. Howard J. Wall, 2002. "Has Japan been left out in the cold by regional integration?," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 84(Sep), pages 25-36.
    5. Theodore H. Moran, 2014. "Foreign Investment and Supply Chains in Emerging Markets: Recurring Problems and Demonstrated Solutions," Working Paper Series WP14-12, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    6. Anwar, Sajid & Nguyen, Lan Phi, 2011. "Foreign direct investment and trade: The case of Vietnam," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 39-52, January.
    7. Sawhney, Aparna & Kahn, Matthew E., 2012. "Understanding cross-national trends in high-tech renewable power equipment exports to the United States," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 308-318.
    8. Kjetil Bjorvatn & Hans Jarle Kind & Hildegunn Kyvik Nordås, 2002. "The Role of FDI in Economic Development," Nordic Journal of Political Economy, Nordic Journal of Political Economy, vol. 28, pages 109-126.
    9. Harach, Monika & Rodriguez-Crespo, Ernesto, 2014. "Foreign direct investment and trade: A bi-directional gravity approach," Kiel Advanced Studies Working Papers 467, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).
    10. Shan-Li Wang & Feng-Wen Chen & Bing Liao & Cuiju Zhang, 2020. "Foreign Trade, FDI and the Upgrading of Regional Industrial Structure in China: Based on Spatial Econometric Model," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 12(3), pages 1-16, January.
    11. James R. Markusen & Keith E. Maskus, 2001. "General-Equilibrium Approaches to the Multinational Firm: A Review of Theory and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 8334, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Takashi Isogai & Hirofumi Morishita & Rasmus Ruffer, 2002. "Analysis of Intra- and Inter-regional Trade in East Asia:Comparative Advantage Structures and Dynamic Interdependency in Trade Flows," Bank of Japan Working Paper Series International Department,, Bank of Japan.
    13. Elissa Braunstein & Gerald Epstein, 2002. "Bargaining Power and Foreign Direct Investment in China: Can 1.3 Billion Consumers Tame the Multinationals?," SCEPA working paper series. 2002-13, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    14. Greaney, Theresa M. & Li, Yao, 2009. "Assessing foreign direct investment relationships between China, Japan, and the United States," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 611-625, November.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. James R. Markusen & Keith E. Maskus, 2001. "Multinational Firms: Reconciling Theory and Evidence," NBER Chapters, in: Topics in Empirical International Economics: A Festschrift in Honor of Robert E. Lipsey, pages 71-98, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Hyun Song Shin, 2017. "Breaking free of the triple coincidence in international finance," IFC Bulletins chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Statistical implications of the new financial landscape, volume 43, Bank for International Settlements.
    3. Magnus Blomström & Linda S. Goldberg, 2001. "Introduction to "Topics in Empirical International Economics: A Festschrift in Honor of Robert E. Lipsey"," NBER Chapters, in: Topics in Empirical International Economics: A Festschrift in Honor of Robert E. Lipsey, pages 1-14, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Irving B. Kravis & Robert E. Lipsey, 1989. "Technological Characteristics of Industries and the Competitiveness of the U.S. and its Multinational Firms," NBER Working Papers 2933, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Wolfgang Keller & Arik Levinson, 1999. "Environmental Compliance Costs and Foreign Direct Investment Inflows to U.S. States," NBER Working Papers 7369, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Pol Antras & Elhanan Helpman, 2004. "Global Sourcing," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(3), pages 552-580, June.
    7. Jonathan E. Haskel & Sonia C. Pereira & Matthew J. Slaughter, 2007. "Does Inward Foreign Direct Investment Boost the Productivity of Domestic Firms?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(3), pages 482-496, August.
    8. Gerard Hughes, 1999. "Multinational Corporations and Global and International Models of Pension Provision: Evidence from Ireland," Papers WP122, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    9. Mark A. Planting & Jiemin Guo, 2002. "Increasing the Timeliness of U.S. Annual I-O Accounts," BEA Papers 0022, Bureau of Economic Analysis.
    10. Mohamed Mansour Kadah, 2003. "Foreign Direct Investment and International Technology Transfer to Egypt," Working Papers 0317, Economic Research Forum, revised Jun 2003.
    11. John W. Budd & Jozef Konings & Matthew J. Slaughter, 2005. "Wages and International Rent Sharing in Multinational Firms," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(1), pages 73-84, February.
    12. Carol Corrado & Paul Lengermann & Larry Slifman, 2009. "The Contribution of Multinational Corporations to US Productivity Growth, 1977–2000," NBER Chapters, in: International Trade in Services and Intangibles in the Era of Globalization, pages 331-360, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Baumann, Renato & Carneiro, Francisco Galrão, 2002. "Behaviour of Brazilian export firms: implications for the Free Trade Area of the Americas," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), December.
    14. Rachel McCulloch, 1988. "The Challenge to U.S. Leadership in High-Technology Industries (Can the United States Maintain Its Lead? Should It Try?)," NBER Working Papers 2513, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Deborah L. Swenson, 2004. "Foreign Investment and the Mediation of Trade Flows," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(4), pages 609-629, September.
    16. Magnus Blomstrom, 1991. "Host Country Benefits of Foreign Investment," NBER Working Papers 3615, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Blomstrom, Magnus & Lipsey, Robert E., 1986. "The Export Performance of Swedish and U.S. Multinationals," Working Papers 86-32, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
    18. Ben Ferrett & Ian Wooton, 2010. "Competing for a duopoly: international trade and tax competition," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 43(3), pages 776-794, August.
    19. Robert E. Lipsey, 1999. "Foreign Production by U.S. Firms and Parent Firm Employment," NBER Working Papers 7357, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Matthew J. Slaughter, 2002. "Does Inward Foreign Direct Investment Contribute to Skill Upgrading in Developing Countries?," SCEPA working paper series. 2002-08, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F19 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Other
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:8498. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: the person in charge (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service. RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.