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Do Elderly Workers Substitute for Younger Workers in the United States?

In: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: The Relationship to Youth Employment

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  • Jonathan Gruber
  • Kevin Milligan

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Suggested Citation

  • Jonathan Gruber & Kevin Milligan, 2010. "Do Elderly Workers Substitute for Younger Workers in the United States?," NBER Chapters, in: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: The Relationship to Youth Employment, pages 345-360, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:8262
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Courtney Coile & Jonathan Gruber, 2000. "Social Security and Retirement," NBER Working Papers 7830, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Courtney Coile & Jonathan Gruber, 2007. "Future Social Security Entitlements and the Retirement Decision," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(2), pages 234-246, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Wijayanti, F., 2018. "Younger vs. older workers in ASEAN countries: substitutes or complements?," R-Economy, Ural Federal University, Graduate School of Economics and Management, vol. 4(4), pages 151-157.

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