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Stopping Three Big Inflations: Argentina, Brazil, and Peru

In: Reform, Recovery, and Growth: Latin America and the Middle East

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  • Miguel A. Kiguel
  • Nissan Liviatan

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  • Miguel A. Kiguel & Nissan Liviatan, 1995. "Stopping Three Big Inflations: Argentina, Brazil, and Peru," NBER Chapters,in: Reform, Recovery, and Growth: Latin America and the Middle East, pages 369-414 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:7663
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Rudiger Dornbusch & Stanley Fischer, 1986. "Stopping hyperinflations past and present," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 122(1), pages 1-47, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bae, Sang-Kun & Ratti, Ronald A., 2000. "Long-run neutrality, high inflation, and bank insolvencies in Argentina and Brazil," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 581-604, December.
    2. Sebastian Edwards & Domingo F. Cavallo & Arminio Fraga & Jacob Frenkel, 2003. "Exchange Rate Regimes," NBER Chapters,in: Economic and Financial Crises in Emerging Market Economies, pages 31-92 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Rodrigo Sabbatini & Andrés López & Daniel Chudnovsky & Celio Hiratuka & Mariano Francisco Laplane, 2002. "Integración regional e inversión extranjera directa: El caso del MERCOSUR," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 7538 edited by Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID), February.
    4. van den Berg, Jeroen & Candelon, Bertrand & Urbain, Jean-Pierre, 2008. "A cautious note on the use of panel models to predict financial crises," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 101(1), pages 80-83, October.
    5. Pedro Pou, 1997. "What lessons can be learned from recent financial crises? : the Argentine experience," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 141-167.
    6. Sebastian Edwards, 2001. "Exchange Rate Regimes, Capital Flows and Crisis Prevention," NBER Working Papers 8529, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. repec:idb:idbbks:222 is not listed on IDEAS

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