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Changing Retirement Incentives and Retirement in the US

In: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: The Effects of Reforms on Retirement Behavior

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  • Courtney Coile

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  • Courtney Coile, 2023. "Changing Retirement Incentives and Retirement in the US," NBER Chapters, in: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: The Effects of Reforms on Retirement Behavior, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:14895
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    1. Axel Börsch-Supan & Courtney Coile, 2021. "Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Reforms and Retirement Incentives," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number bors-1, July.
    2. John B. Shoven & Sita Nataraj Slavov & David A. Wise, 2017. "Social Security Claiming Decisions: Survey Evidence," NBER Working Papers 23729, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Manasi Deshpande & Itzik Fadlon & Colin Gray, 2020. "How Sticky is Retirement Behavior in the U.S.? Responses to Changes in the Full Retirement Age," NBER Working Papers 27190, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Alicia H. Munnell, 2022. "How to Think About Recent Trends in the Average Retirement Age?," Issues in Brief ib2022-11, Center for Retirement Research.
    5. Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 2004. "Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Micro-Estimation," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number grub04-1, July.
    6. Alan J. Auerbach & Laurence J. Kotlikoff & Darryl Koehler & Manni Yu, 2017. "Is Uncle Sam Inducing the Elderly to Retire?," Tax Policy and the Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(1), pages 1-42.
    7. Mastrobuoni, Giovanni, 2009. "Labor supply effects of the recent social security benefit cuts: Empirical estimates using cohort discontinuities," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(11-12), pages 1224-1233, December.
    8. Irena Dushi & Leora Friedberg & Anthony Webb, 2021. "Is the Adjustment of Social Security Benefits Actuarially Fair, and If So, for Whom?," SCEPA working paper series. 2021-04, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    9. Duggan, Mark & Dushi, Irena & Jeong, Sookyo & Li, Gina, 2023. "The effects of changes in social security’s delayed retirement credit: Evidence from administrative data," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 223(C).
    10. Alexander M. Gelber & Damon Jones & Daniel W. Sacks, 2020. "Estimating Adjustment Frictions Using Nonlinear Budget Sets: Method and Evidence from the Earnings Test," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 12(1), pages 1-31, January.
    11. Coile, Courtney C. & Milligan, Kevin & Wise, David A. (ed.), 2019. "Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226619293, November.
    12. Courtney C. Coile & Kevin Milligan & David A. Wise, 2019. "Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Working Longer," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number coil-1, July.
    13. Shoven, John B. & Slavov, Sita Nataraj, 2014. "Does it pay to delay social security?," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(2), pages 121-144, April.
    14. Börsch-Supan, Axel & Coile, Courtney C. (ed.), 2021. "Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226674100, November.
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