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Andreas Madestam

Personal Details

First Name:Andreas
Middle Name:
Last Name:Madestam
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pma989
http://www.ne.su.se/andreasmadestam

Affiliation

Nationalekonomiska institutionen
Stockholms Universitet

Stockholm, Sweden
http://www.ne.su.se/

: +46 8 16 20 00
+46 8 16 14 25
SE-106 91 Stockholm
RePEc:edi:neisuse (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Madestam, Andreas & Yanagizawa-Drott, David, 2012. "Shaping of the Nation: The Effect of Fourth of July on Political Preferences and Behavior in the United States," Working Paper Series rwp12-034, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  2. Yanagizawa-Drott, David Hans & Madestam, Andreas, 2012. "Shaping the Nation: The Effect of Fourth of July on Political Preferences and Behavior in the United States," Scholarly Articles 9396434, Harvard Kennedy School of Government.
  3. Andreas Madestam & David Yanagizawa-Drott, 2011. "Shaping the Nation: Estimating the Impact of Fourth of July Using a Natural Experiment," Working Papers 399, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  4. Andreas Madestam, 2011. "The Social Cost of a Credit Monopoly," Working Papers 422, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  5. Thorsten Beck & Patrick Behr & Andreas Madestam, 2011. "Sex and Credit: Is There a Gender Bias in Lending?," Working Papers 411, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  6. Andreas Madestam, 2008. "Informal Finance: A Theory of Moneylenders," Working Papers 347, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.

Articles

  1. Madestam, Andreas, 2014. "Informal finance: A theory of moneylenders," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 157-174.
  2. Andreas Madestam & Daniel Shoag & Stan Veuger & David Yanagizawa-Drott, 2013. "Do Political Protests Matter? Evidence from the Tea Party Movement," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(4), pages 1633-1685.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Madestam, Andreas & Yanagizawa-Drott, David, 2012. "Shaping of the Nation: The Effect of Fourth of July on Political Preferences and Behavior in the United States," Working Paper Series rwp12-034, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.

    Cited by:

    1. Bonnier, Evelina & Poulsen, Jonas & Rogall, Thorsten & Stryjan, Miri, 2015. "Preparing for Genocide: Community Work in Rwanda," Working Paper Series 2015:1, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    2. Marc Sangnier & Yanos Zylberberg, 2017. "Protests and trust in the state: Evidence from African countries," Post-Print hal-01634049, HAL.
    3. Bonnier, Evelina & Poulsen, Jonas & Rogall, Thorsten & Stryjan, Miri, 2015. "Preparing for Genocide: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Rwanda," SITE Working Paper Series 31, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm Institute of Transition Economics, revised 10 Nov 2016.
    4. Cozzi, Guido & Mantovan, Noemi & Sauer, Robert M., 2013. "Does It Pay to Work for Free? Wage Returns and Gender Differences in the Market for Volunteers," IZA Discussion Papers 7697, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Marc Sangnier & Yanos Zylberberg, 2013. "Protests and Beliefs in Social Coordination in Africa," Working Papers halshs-00822377, HAL.
    6. Thomas Fujiwara & Kyle C. Meng & Tom Vogl, 2013. "Estimating Habit Formation in Voting," NBER Working Papers 19721, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Ruben Durante & Paolo Pinotti & Andrea Tesei, 2013. "Voting Alone? The Political and Cultural Consequences of Commercial TV," Sciences Po publications 2013-10, Sciences Po.
    8. Ruben Durante & Paolo Pinotti & Andrea Tesei, 2014. "No News, Big News. The political consequences of entertainment TV," Working Papers 063, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    9. Koenig, Christoph, 2015. "The Political Fallout of Chernobyl: Evidence from West-German Elections," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1081, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    10. Achyuta Adhvaryu & James Fenske, 2014. "Conflict and the Formation of Political Beliefs in Africa," HiCN Working Papers 164, Households in Conflict Network.

  2. Yanagizawa-Drott, David Hans & Madestam, Andreas, 2012. "Shaping the Nation: The Effect of Fourth of July on Political Preferences and Behavior in the United States," Scholarly Articles 9396434, Harvard Kennedy School of Government.

    Cited by:

    1. Bonnier, Evelina & Poulsen, Jonas & Rogall, Thorsten & Stryjan, Miri, 2015. "Preparing for Genocide: Community Work in Rwanda," Working Paper Series 2015:1, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    2. Marc Sangnier & Yanos Zylberberg, 2017. "Protests and trust in the state: Evidence from African countries," Post-Print hal-01634049, HAL.
    3. Bonnier, Evelina & Poulsen, Jonas & Rogall, Thorsten & Stryjan, Miri, 2015. "Preparing for Genocide: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Rwanda," SITE Working Paper Series 31, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm Institute of Transition Economics, revised 10 Nov 2016.
    4. Guido Cozzi & Noemi Mantovan & Robert M. Sauer, 2015. "Does it Pay to Work for Free? Negative Selection and the Wage Returns to Volunteer Experience," CHILD Working Papers Series 32, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA.
    5. Marc Sangnier & Yanos Zylberberg, 2013. "Protests and Beliefs in Social Coordination in Africa," Working Papers halshs-00822377, HAL.
    6. Ruben Durante & Paolo Pinotti & Andrea Tesei, 2014. "No News, Big News. The political consequences of entertainment TV," Working Papers 063, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    7. Koenig, Christoph, 2015. "The Political Fallout of Chernobyl: Evidence from West-German Elections," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1081, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    8. Akbulut-Yuksel, Mevlude & Okoye, Dozie & Yuksel, Mutlu, 2017. "Learning to Participate in Politics: Evidence from Jewish Expulsions in Nazi Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 10778, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Achyuta Adhvaryu & James Fenske, 2014. "Conflict and the Formation of Political Beliefs in Africa," HiCN Working Papers 164, Households in Conflict Network.

  3. Andreas Madestam & David Yanagizawa-Drott, 2011. "Shaping the Nation: Estimating the Impact of Fourth of July Using a Natural Experiment," Working Papers 399, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.

    Cited by:

    1. Nathan Nunn, 2012. "Culture and the Historical Process," NBER Working Papers 17869, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  4. Thorsten Beck & Patrick Behr & Andreas Madestam, 2011. "Sex and Credit: Is There a Gender Bias in Lending?," Working Papers 411, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.

    Cited by:

    1. Simon Quinn & Tom Gole, 2014. "Committees and Status Quo Bias: Structural Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment," Economics Series Working Papers 733, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    2. Elmas Yaldiz Hanedar & Eleonora Broccardo & Flavio Bazzana, 2012. "Collateral Requirements of SMEs:The Evidence from Less–Developed Countries," Centro Studi di Banca e Finanza (CEFIN) (Center for Studies in Banking and Finance) 12111, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Economia "Marco Biagi".
    3. Rolando Gonzales & Gabriela Aguilera-Lizarazu & Andrea Rojas-Hosse & Patricia Aranda, 2016. "Preference for women but less preference for indigenous women: A lab-field experiment of loan discrimination in a developing economy," Working Papers PIERI 2016-24, PEP-PIERI.
    4. Geoffrey Barrows, 2018. "Do Entrepreneurship Policies Work? Evidence From 460 Start-Up Program Competitions Across the Globe," Working Papers 2018.02, FAERE - French Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.
    5. Juri Marcucci & Paolo Emilio Mistrulli, 2013. "Female entrepreneurs in trouble: do their bad loans last longer?," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 185, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    6. Beatriz Cuéllar-Fernández & Yolanda Fuertes-Callén & Carlos Serrano-Cinca & Begoña Gutiérrez-Nieto, 2016. "Determinants of margin in microfinance institutions," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(4), pages 300-311, January.
    7. Aterido, Reyes & Beck, Thorsten & Iacovone, Leonardo, 2011. "Gender and finance in Sub-Saharan Africa : are women disadvantaged ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5571, The World Bank.
    8. Aggarwal, Raj & Goodell, John, 2013. "Lending to women in microfinance: influence of social trust and national culture Lending to women in microfinance: influence of social trust and national culture," Working Paper 1317, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    9. Steven Ongena & Alexander Popov, 2016. "Gender Bias and Credit Access," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 48(8), pages 1691-1724, December.
    10. Behr, Patrick & Drexler, Alejandro & Gropp, Reint & Guettler, Andre, 2014. "Financial incentives and loan officer behavior: Multitasking and allocation of effort under an incomplete contract," SAFE Working Paper Series 62, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    11. Suparna Chakraborty, 2014. "Laws, attitudes and financial inclusion of women: A cross-country investigation," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(1), pages 333-353.
    12. Ina Ganguli & Ricardo Hausmann & Martina Viarengo, 2017. "Career dynamics and gender gaps among employees in the microfinance sector," WIDER Working Paper Series 117, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

  5. Andreas Madestam, 2008. "Informal Finance: A Theory of Moneylenders," Working Papers 347, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.

    Cited by:

    1. Batini, Nicoletta & Kim, Young-Bae & Levine, Paul & Lotti, Emanuela, 2011. "Informal Labour and Credit Markets: A Survey," Working Papers 11/94, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy.
    2. Erhardt, Eva, 2017. "Microfinance beyond self-employment: Evidence for firms in Bulgaria," MPRA Paper 79294, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Migheli, Matteo, 2016. "Land Ownership, Access to Informal Credit and Its Cost in Rural Vietnam," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201619, University of Turin.
    4. Cao Thi Khanh Nguyet, 2014. "Why do Small and Medium Enterprises Need to Access Informal Credit? The Case of Vietnam," International Finance and Banking, Macrothink Institute, vol. 1(2), pages 1-17, December.
    5. Togba, Edith Leadaut, 2012. "Microfinance and households access to credit: Evidence from Côte d’Ivoire," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 473-486.
    6. Leon, Florian, 2015. "Does bank competition alleviate credit constraints in developing countries?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 130-142.
    7. Ghosh, Saibal & Kumar, Rakesh, 2014. "Monetary policy and informal finance: Is there a pecking order?," MPRA Paper 65243, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Edwin Arbey Hernández García & Andrés Felipe Oviedo Gómez, 2016. "Mercado del crédito informal en Colombia: una aproximación empírica," ENSAYOS DE ECONOMÍA 015539, UNIVERSIDAD NACIONAL DE COLOMBIA SEDE MEDELLIN.
    9. Athar Iqbal & Bilal Hamid, 2012. "Retail Business Owners Preference: Why not Formal Financing?," South Asian Journal of Management Sciences (SAJMS), Iqra University, Iqra University, vol. 6(1), pages 18-22, Spring.
    10. Colombo, Emilio & Onnis, Luisanna & Tirelli, Patrizio, 2016. "Shadow economies at times of banking crises: Empirics and theory," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 180-190.
    11. Duo Qin & Zhong Xu & Xue-Chun Zhang, 2013. "How Much Has Private Credit Lending Reacted to Monetary Policy in China? The Case of Wenzhou," Working Papers 178, Department of Economics, SOAS, University of London, UK.
    12. Degryse, Hans & Lu, Liping & Ongena, Steven, 2016. "Informal or formal financing? Evidence on the co-funding of Chinese firms," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 31-50.
    13. Raccanello, Kristiano, 2016. "Do Microenterprises’ size and status matter to access informal finance?./ ¿El tamaño y el registro de las microempresas permite el acceso a los mercados financieros informales?," Panorama Económico, Escuela Superior de Economía, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, vol. 12(23), pages 123-152, Segundo s.
    14. Karaivanov, Alexander & Kessler, Anke, 2018. "(Dis)advantages of informal loans – Theory and evidence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 100-128.
    15. Qin, Duo & Xu, Zhong & Zhang, Xuechun, 2014. "How much informal credit lending responded to monetary policy in China? The case of Wenzhou," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31, pages 22-31.
    16. Marcello Pagnini & Paola Rossi & Valerio Vacca & Carmen Kislat & Lukas Menkhoff & Doris Neuberger, 2017. "Credit Market Structure and Collateral in Rural Thailand," Economic Notes, Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena SpA, vol. 46(3), pages 587-632, November.
    17. Elmas Yaldız Hanedar & Yener Altunbas & Flavio Bazzana, 2014. "Why Do SMEs Use Informal Credit? A Comparison between Countries," Journal of Financial Management, Markets and Institutions, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 1, pages 65-86, July.
    18. Fan, Ying & Wu, Jing & Yang, Zan, 2017. "Informal borrowing and home purchase: Evidence from urban China," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 108-118.

Articles

  1. Madestam, Andreas, 2014. "Informal finance: A theory of moneylenders," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 157-174.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Andreas Madestam & Daniel Shoag & Stan Veuger & David Yanagizawa-Drott, 2013. "Do Political Protests Matter? Evidence from the Tea Party Movement," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(4), pages 1633-1685.

    Cited by:

    1. Christian Ochsner & Felix Rösel, 2017. "Activated History - The Case of the Turkish Sieges of Vienna," CESifo Working Paper Series 6586, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Meier, Armando N. & Schmid, Lukas D. & Stutzer, Alois, 2016. "Rain, Emotions and Voting for the Status Quo," IZA Discussion Papers 10350, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Becker, Sascha O. & Fetzer, Thiemo & Novy, Dennis, 2017. "Who Voted for Brexit? A Comprehensive District-Level Analysis," CEPR Discussion Papers 11954, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. McMurray, Joseph, 2017. "Voting as communicating: Mandates, multiple candidates, and the signaling voter's curse," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 199-223.
    5. David Autor & David Dorn & Gordon Hanson & Kaveh Majlesi, 2016. "Importing Political Polarization? The Electoral Consequences of Rising Trade Exposure," NBER Working Papers 22637, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Marco Manacorda & Andrea Tesei, 2016. "Liberation Technology: Mobile Phones and Political Mobilization in Africa," Working Papers 785, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    7. Enikolopov, Ruben & Makarin, Alexey & Petrova, Maria, 2016. "Social Media and Protest Participation: Evidence from Russia," CEPR Discussion Papers 11254, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Bonnier, Evelina & Poulsen, Jonas & Rogall, Thorsten & Stryjan, Miri, 2015. "Preparing for Genocide: Community Work in Rwanda," Working Paper Series 2015:1, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    9. El-Mallakh, Nelly & Maurel, Mathilde & Speciale, Biagio, 2018. "Arab spring protests and women's labor market outcomes: Evidence from the Egyptian revolution," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 656-682.
    10. Marc Sangnier & Yanos Zylberberg, 2017. "Protests and trust in the state: Evidence from African countries," Post-Print hal-01634049, HAL.
    11. Acemoglu, Daron & Hassan, Tarek & Tahoun, Ahmed, 2014. "The Power of the Street: Evidence from Egypt's Arab Spring," CEPR Discussion Papers 10262, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Daniel M. Hungerman & Kevin Rinz & Tim Weninger & Chungeun Yoon, 2018. "Political Campaigns and Church Contributions," NBER Working Papers 24374, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Anderson, R. Warren & Johnson, Noel D & Koyama, Mark, 2013. "From the Persecuting to the Protective State? Jewish Expulsions and Weather Shocks from 1100 to 1800," MPRA Paper 44228, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Leonardo Bursztyn & Davide Cantoni & Patricia Funk & Noam Yuchtman, 2017. "Polls, the Press, and Political Participation: The Effects of Anticipated Election Closeness on Voter Turnout," Working Papers 2017-052, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    15. Nelly El-Mallakh, 2017. "Did the Egyptian protests lead to change? Evidence from Egypt's first free Presidential elections," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01625199, HAL.
    16. Nelly El-Mallakh & Mathilde Maurel & Biagio Speciale, 2016. "Arab Spring Protests and Women's Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from the Egyptian Revolution," Working Papers hal-01309651, HAL.
    17. Acemoglu, Daron & De Feo, Giuseppe & De Luca, Giacomo, 2017. "Weak States: Causes and Consequences of the Sicilian Mafia," CEPR Discussion Papers 12530, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    18. Bonnier, Evelina & Poulsen, Jonas & Rogall, Thorsten & Stryjan, Miri, 2015. "Preparing for Genocide: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Rwanda," SITE Working Paper Series 31, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm Institute of Transition Economics, revised 10 Nov 2016.
    19. Nelly El-Mallakh & Mathilde Maurel & Biagio Speciale, 2015. "Arab Spring Protests and Women’s Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from the Egyptian Revolution," Working Papers 957, Economic Research Forum, revised Oct 2015.
    20. Guido Cozzi & Noemi Mantovan & Robert M. Sauer, 2015. "Does it Pay to Work for Free? Negative Selection and the Wage Returns to Volunteer Experience," CHILD Working Papers Series 32, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA.
    21. Cozzi, Guido & Mantovan, Noemi & Sauer, Robert M., 2013. "Does It Pay to Work for Free? Wage Returns and Gender Differences in the Market for Volunteers," IZA Discussion Papers 7697, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    22. Herrnstadt, Evan & Muehlegger, Erich, 2014. "Weather, salience of climate change and congressional voting," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 435-448.
    23. Marc Sangnier & Yanos Zylberberg, 2013. "Protests and Beliefs in Social Coordination in Africa," Working Papers halshs-00822377, HAL.
    24. Thomas Fujiwara & Kyle C. Meng & Tom Vogl, 2013. "Estimating Habit Formation in Voting," NBER Working Papers 19721, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    25. Viktar Fedaseyeu & Erik Gilje & Philip E. Strahan, 2015. "Voter Preferences and Political Change: Evidence from Shale Booms," NBER Working Papers 21789, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    26. Nicola Fuchs-Schuendeln & Tarek Alexander Hassan, 2015. "Natural Experiments in Macroeconomics," NBER Working Papers 21228, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    27. Stan Veuger & Daniel Shoag, 2013. "Uncertainty and the geography of the Great Recession," AEI Economics Working Papers 694, American Enterprise Institute.
    28. Chen, Daniel L. & Levonyan, Vardges & Yeh, Susan, 2016. "Policies Affect Preferences: Evidence from Random Variation in Abortion Jurisprudence," TSE Working Papers 16-723, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    29. Patricia Justino & Bruno Martorano, 2016. "Inequality, Distributive Beliefs and Protests: A Recent Story from Latin America," Working Papers - Economics wp2016_06.rdf, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa.
    30. Jo Thori Lind, 2015. "Spurious Weather Effects," CESifo Working Paper Series 5365, CESifo Group Munich.
    31. Jo Thori Lind, 2014. "Rainy Day Politics - An Instrumental Variables Approach to the Effect of Parties on Political Outcomes," CESifo Working Paper Series 4911, CESifo Group Munich.
    32. Venkatesh, Raghul S, 2017. "Activism, Costly Participation, and Polarization," CRETA Online Discussion Paper Series 30, Centre for Research in Economic Theory and its Applications CRETA.
    33. Alessandro Bucciol & Luca Zarri, 2013. "Lying in Politics: Evidence from the US," Working Papers 22/2013, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
    34. Camilo García-Jimeno & Angel Iglesias & Pinar Yildirim, 2018. "Women, Rails and Telegraphs: An Empirical Study of Information Diffusion and Collective Action," NBER Working Papers 24495, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    35. Davide Cantoni & David Y. Yang & Noam Yuchtman & Y. Jane Zhang, 2017. "Are Protests Games of Strategic Complements or Substitutes? Experimental Evidence from Hong Kong's Democracy Movement," NBER Working Papers 23110, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    36. Sarsons, Heather, 2015. "Rainfall and conflict: A cautionary tale," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 62-72.
    37. Nelly El-Mallakh, 2017. "Did the Egyptian protests lead to change? Evidence from Egypt's first free Presidential elections," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 17044, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    38. Achyuta Adhvaryu & James Fenske, 2014. "Conflict and the Formation of Political Beliefs in Africa," HiCN Working Papers 164, Households in Conflict Network.
    39. William Bassett & Selva Demiralp & Nathan Lloyd, 2016. "Government Support of Banks and Bank Lending," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1611, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 5 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MFD: Microfinance (3) 2009-10-03 2011-09-16 2011-11-01
  2. NEP-DEV: Development (2) 2009-10-03 2011-09-16
  3. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (2) 2011-06-11 2012-09-30
  4. NEP-CFN: Corporate Finance (1) 2009-10-03
  5. NEP-COM: Industrial Competition (1) 2011-11-01
  6. NEP-CTA: Contract Theory & Applications (1) 2009-10-03
  7. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2011-09-16
  8. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2012-09-30
  9. NEP-HME: Heterodox Microeconomics (1) 2011-09-16
  10. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2012-09-30

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