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Davy Lerouge

Personal Details

First Name:Davy
Middle Name:
Last Name:Lerouge
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RePEc Short-ID:ple348
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http://www.tilburguniversity.nl/webwijs/show/?uid=d.lerouge

Affiliation

School of Economics and Management
Universiteit van Tilburg

Tilburg, Netherlands
http://www.tilburguniversity.edu/nl/over-tilburg-university/schools/economics-and-management/

: 013 - 466 2420
013 - 466 3072
Postbus 90153, 5000 LE TILBURG
RePEc:edi:fekubnl (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Davy Lerouge, 2009. "Evaluating the Benefits of Distraction on Product Evaluations: The Mind-Set Effect," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 36(3), pages 367-379.
  2. Davy Lerouge & Luk Warlop, 2006. "Why It Is So Hard to Predict Our Partner's Product Preferences: The Effect of Target Familiarity on Prediction Accuracy," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(3), pages 393-402, November.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Davy Lerouge, 2009. "Evaluating the Benefits of Distraction on Product Evaluations: The Mind-Set Effect," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 36(3), pages 367-379.

    Cited by:

    1. Laurent Waroquier & David Marchiori & Olivier Klein & Axel Cleeremans, 2009. "Methodological pitfalls of the Unconscious Thought paradigm," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 4(7), pages 601-610, December.
    2. Mark Nieuwenstein & Hedderik van Rijn, 2012. "The unconscious thought advantage: Further replication failures from a search for confirmatory evidence," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 7(6), pages 779-798, November.
    3. V. I. Yukalov & D. Sornette, 2014. "Manipulating decision making of typical agents," Papers 1409.0636, arXiv.org.
    4. Jung Min Jang & Song Oh Yoon, 2016. "The effect of attribute-based and alternative-based processing on consumer choice in context," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 27(3), pages 511-524, September.
    5. Carolina Werle & Brian Wansink & Collin Payne, 2015. "Is it fun or exercise? The framing of physical activity biases subsequent snacking," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 26(4), pages 691-702, December.
    6. Selin Atalay, A. & Onur Bodur, H. & Bressoud, Etienne, 2017. "When and How Multitasking Impacts Consumer Shopping Decisions," Journal of Retailing, Elsevier, vol. 93(2), pages 187-200.
    7. Balazs Aczel & Bence Lukacs & Judit Komlos & Michael R. F. Aitken, 2011. "Unconscious intuition or conscious analysis? Critical questions for the Deliberation-Without-Attention paradigm," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(4), pages 351-358, June.

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