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Yosh Halberstam

Personal Details

First Name:Yosh
Middle Name:
Last Name:Halberstam
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pha674

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of Toronto

Toronto, Canada
http://www.economics.utoronto.ca/

: (416) 978-4724

150 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario
RePEc:edi:deutoca (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers

Working papers

  1. Yosh Halberstam & Brian Knight, 2014. "Homophily, Group Size, and the Diffusion of Political Information in Social Networks: Evidence from Twitter," NBER Working Papers 20681, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Leah Brooks & Yosh Halberstam & Justin Phillips, 2012. "Spending within limits: Evidence from municipal fiscal restraints," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2012-52, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Yosh Halberstam & Brian Knight, 2014. "Homophily, Group Size, and the Diffusion of Political Information in Social Networks: Evidence from Twitter," NBER Working Papers 20681, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Enikolopov, Ruben & Makarin, Alexey & Petrova, Maria, 2016. "Social Media and Protest Participation: Evidence from Russia," CEPR Discussion Papers 11254, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Shertzer, Allison, 2016. "Immigrant group size and political mobilization: Evidence from European migration to the United States," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 139(C), pages 1-12.
    3. Fabrizio Germano & Francesco Sobbrio, 2017. "Opinion Dynamics via Search Engines (and other Algorithmic Gatekeepers)," Working Papers 962, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    4. Yuriy Gorodnichenko & Tho Pham & Oleksandr Talavera, 2018. "Social media, sentiment and public opinions: Evidence from #Brexit and #USElection," Working Papers 2018-01, Swansea University, School of Management.
    5. Kodila-Tedika, Oasis, 2018. "Natural Resource Governance: Does Social Media Matter?," MPRA Paper 84809, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Enikolopov, Ruben & Petrova, Maria & Sonin, Konstantin, 2016. "Social Media and Corruption," CEPR Discussion Papers 11263, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Petrova, Maria & Sen, Ananya & Yildirim, Pinar, 2017. "Social Media and Political Donations: New Technology and Incumbency Advantage in the United States," CEPR Discussion Papers 11808, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Önder, Ali Sina & Portmann, Marco & Stadelmann, David, 2015. "No Place like Home: Opinion Formation with Homophily and Implications for Policy Decisions," Working Paper Series, Center for Fiscal Studies 2015:4, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    9. Ascensión Andina-Díaz & José A. García-Martínez & Antonio Parravano, 2017. "The market for scoops: A dynamic approach," Working Papers 2017-03, Universidad de Málaga, Department of Economic Theory, Málaga Economic Theory Research Center.
    10. Levi Boxell & Matthew Gentzkow & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2017. "Is the Internet Causing Political Polarization? Evidence from Demographics," NBER Working Papers 23258, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Clouston, Sean A.P. & Rubin, Marcie S. & Chae, David H. & Freese, Jeremy & Nemesure, Barbara & Link, Bruce G., 2017. "Fundamental causes of accelerated declines in colorectal cancer mortality: Modeling multiple ways that disadvantage influences mortality risk," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 187(C), pages 1-10.

  2. Leah Brooks & Yosh Halberstam & Justin Phillips, 2012. "Spending within limits: Evidence from municipal fiscal restraints," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2012-52, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

    Cited by:

    1. Stephen Coate, 2014. "Optimal Fiscal Limits," NBER Working Papers 20643, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Mark Gradstein, 2017. "Self-Imposition Of Public Oversight," Working Papers 1711, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
    3. Heinemann, Friedrich & Moessinger, Marc-Daniel & Yeter, Mustafa, 2018. "Do fiscal rules constrain fiscal policy? A meta-regression-analysis," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 69-92.
    4. Pengju Zhang, 2018. "The unintended impact of tax and expenditure limitations on the use of special districts: the politics of circumvention," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 21-50, February.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (2) 2012-09-16 2014-12-19. Author is listed
  2. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (1) 2014-12-19. Author is listed
  3. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (1) 2012-09-16. Author is listed
  4. NEP-NET: Network Economics (1) 2014-12-19. Author is listed
  5. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2012-09-16. Author is listed
  6. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2014-12-19. Author is listed

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