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Dolores Ferrero

Personal Details

First Name:Dolores
Middle Name:
Last Name:Ferrero
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pfe324
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Departamento de Fundamentos da Análise Económica e Historia e Instituciócs Económicas
Facultade de Ciencias Económicas e Empresariais
Universidade de Vigo

Vigo, Spain
http://webs.uvigo.es/depx08/

: (+34) 986-812520
(+34) 986-812401
Campus de Lagoas Marcosende, s/n, 36200 VIGO
RePEc:edi:dhviges (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Raquel Arévalo Tomé & Loly Ferrero Martínez & Mª Soledad Otero Giráldez & Jacobo de Uña Álvarez, 2008. "Movilidad residencial en España: un análisis longitudinal," Working Papers 0803, Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Economía Aplicada.

Articles

  1. Dolores Ferrero Martínez & Amaia Iza, 2004. "Skill premium effects on fertility and female labor force supply," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(1), pages 1-16, February.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

    Sorry, no citations of working papers recorded.

Articles

  1. Dolores Ferrero Martínez & Amaia Iza, 2004. "Skill premium effects on fertility and female labor force supply," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(1), pages 1-16, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Olivier Thévenon & Angela Luci Greulich, 2014. "Does Economic Advancement ‘Cause’ a Re-increase in Fertility? An Empirical Analysis for OECD Countries (1960–2007)," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00966571, HAL.
    2. Patricia Apps & Ray Rees, 2005. "Gender, Time Use and Public Policy Over the Life Cycle," CEPR Discussion Papers 500, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    3. Day, Creina & Guest, Ross, 2016. "Fertility and female wages: A new link via house prices," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 121-132.
    4. Tomas Kögel, 2006. "An explanation of the positive correlation between fertility and female employment across Western European countries," Discussion Paper Series 2006_11, Department of Economics, Loughborough University.
    5. Attanasio, O. & Low, H. & Sanchez-Marcos, V., 2004. "Explaining Changes in Female Labour Supply in a Life-cycle Model," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0451, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    6. Caroline Krafft, 2016. "Why is Fertility on the Rise in Egypt? The Role of Women’s Employment Opportunities," Working Papers 1050, Economic Research Forum, revised 09 Jan 2016.
    7. Park, Seonyoung, 2018. "A structural explanation of recent changes in life-cycle labor supply and fertility behavior of married women in the United States," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 129-168.
    8. Hans Fehr & Daniela Ujhelyiova, 2011. "Fertility, Female Labor Supply, and Family Policy," CESifo Working Paper Series 3455, CESifo Group Munich.
    9. Miyake, Atsushi & Yasuoka, Masaya, 2016. "Public Education and Child-Care Policies with Pay-As-You-Go Pension," MPRA Paper 75315, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Seonyoung Park, 2014. "Recent Stagnation of Married Women’s Labor Supply: A Life-Cycle Structural Model," Working Papers 14-10, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
    11. Maricruz Lacalle-Calderon & Manuel Perez-Trujillo & Isabel Neira, 2017. "Fertility and Economic Development: Quantile Regression Evidence on the Inverse J-shaped Pattern," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 33(1), pages 1-31, February.
    12. Echávarri Aguinaga, Rebeca, 2009. "Education and the dynamics of family decisions," DFAEII Working Papers 2009-01, University of the Basque Country - Department of Foundations of Economic Analysis II.
    13. Kazumasa Oguro & Masaya Yasuoka, 2017. "Stress, Child Care, and Fertility," Discussion Paper Series 153, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University, revised Jan 2017.
    14. Makoto Hirazawa & Akira Yakita, 2009. "Fertility, child care outside the home, and pay-as-you-go social security," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 22(3), pages 565-583, July.
    15. Creina Day, 2012. "Will Fertility Rebound In Japan," Asia Pacific Economic Papers 395, Australia-Japan Research Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    16. Georges, Patrick & Seçkin, Aylin, 2016. "From pro-natalist rhetoric to population policies in Turkey? An OLG general equilibrium analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 79-93.
    17. Masatoshi Jinno & Masaya Yasuoka, 2016. "Are the social security benefits of pensions or child-care policies best financed by a consumption tax?," Business and Economic Horizons (BEH), Prague Development Center, vol. 12(3), pages 94-112, September.
    18. Creina Day, 2016. "Can Theory Explain the Evidence on Fertility Decline Reversal?," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 49(2), pages 136-145, February.
    19. Creina Day & Ross S. Guest, 2014. "The Effect of Gender Wages and Working Age Populations on Fertility and House Prices," Crawford School Research Papers 1401, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    20. Sánchez-Mangas, Rocio & Sánchez-Marcos, Virginia, 2008. "Balancing family and work: The effect of cash benefits for working mothers," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(6), pages 1127-1142, December.
    21. Masaya Yasuoka, 2014. "Child-care Policies and Pension in an Endogenous Fertility Model," Discussion Paper Series 114, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University, revised Jan 2014.
    22. Yamamura, Eiji & Antonio R, Andrés, 2011. "Trust and Fertility: Evidence from OECD countries," MPRA Paper 29978, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    23. Creina Day, 2012. "Economic Growth, Gender Wage Gap and Fertility Rebound," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 88(s1), pages 88-99, June.
    24. Rocio S·nchez-Mangas & Virginia S·nchez-Marcos, "undated". "Reconciling female labor participation and motherhood: the effect of benefits for working mothers," Studies on the Spanish Economy 195, FEDEA.
    25. Yasuoka, Masaya & Miyake, Atsushi, 2010. "Change in the transition of the fertility rate," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 106(2), pages 78-80, February.

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