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Alejandro Corvalan

Personal Details

First Name:Alejandro
Middle Name:
Last Name:Corvalan
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pco569
https://sites.google.com/site/webcorvalan/

Affiliation

Centro de Economía Aplicada
Universidad de Chile

Santiago, Chile
http://www.dii.uchile.cl/cea/
RePEc:edi:ceuclcl (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Alejandro Corvalan & Paulo Cox, 2014. "`Can I register to vote before I am 18?'Information Costs and Participation," Working Papers 60, Facultad de Economía y Empresa, Universidad Diego Portales.
  2. Miguel Vargas & Alejandro Corvarlan, 2013. "Segregation and Social Conflict: An Empirical Analysis," Working Papers 42, Facultad de Economía y Empresa, Universidad Diego Portales.
  3. Jess Benhabib & Alejandro Corvalan & Mark M. Spiegel, 2011. "Reestablishing the Income-Democracy Nexus," NBER Working Papers 16832, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Alejandro Corvalan, 2011. "Institutional Design aganist Electoral Participation: the case of Chile," Working Papers 32, Facultad de Economía y Empresa, Universidad Diego Portales.
  5. Alejandro Corvalan, 2011. "Subsidies for whom? The rule of (G+1)/2," Working Papers 31, Facultad de Economía y Empresa, Universidad Diego Portales.
  6. Alejandro Corvalán & Pablo Serra, 2005. "Sunk Prices And Salesforce Competition," Documentos de Trabajo 216, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
  7. Alejandro Corvalán, 2005. "Well Diversified Efficient Portfolios," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 336, Central Bank of Chile.
  8. Alejandro Corvalán, 2005. "Mixed Tactical Asset Allocation," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 323, Central Bank of Chile.

Articles

  1. Alejandro Corvalan & Pablo Querubín & Sergio Vicente, 2020. "The Political Class and Redistributive Policies," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 18(1), pages 1-48.
  2. Corvalan, Alejandro & Pazzona, Matteo, 2019. "Persistent commodity shocks and transitory crime effects," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 158(C), pages 110-127.
  3. Florencia Torche & Alejandro Corvalan, 2018. "Estimating Intergenerational Mobility With Grouped Data," Sociological Methods & Research, , vol. 47(4), pages 787-811, November.
  4. Alejandro Corvalan, 2018. "How to rank rankings? Group performance in multiple-prize contests," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 51(2), pages 361-380, August.
  5. Corvalan, Alejandro & Cox, Paulo & Osorio, Rodrigo, 2018. "Indirect political budget cycles: Evidence from Chilean municipalities," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 1-14.
  6. Corvalan, Alejandro & Melo, Emerson & Sherman, Robert & Shum, Matt, 2017. "Bounding Causal Effects in Ecological Inference Problems," Political Science Research and Methods, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(3), pages 555-565, July.
  7. Corvalan, Alejandro & Vargas, Miguel, 2015. "Segregation and conflict: An empirical analysis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 212-222.
  8. Contreras, Jose L. & Corvalan, Alejandro, 2014. "Olympic Games: No legacy for sports," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 122(2), pages 268-271.
  9. Alejandro Corvalan, 2014. "The Impact of a Marginal Subsidy on Gini Indices," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(3), pages 596-603, September.
  10. Benhabib, Jess & Corvalan, Alejandro & Spiegel, Mark M., 2013. "Income and democracy: Evidence from nonlinear estimations," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 118(3), pages 489-492.
  11. Berger, Daniel & Corvalan, Alejandro & Easterly, William & Satyanath, Shanker, 2013. "Do superpower interventions have short and long term consequences for democracy?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 22-34.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Jess Benhabib & Alejandro Corvalan & Mark M. Spiegel, 2011. "Reestablishing the Income-Democracy Nexus," NBER Working Papers 16832, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Gilli Mario & Li Yuan, 2012. "Citizenry Accountability in Autocracies," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 18(3), pages 1-6, December.
    2. Charl Jooste, Guangling (Dave) Liu and Ruthira Naraidoo, 2013. "Analysing the Effects of Fiscal Policy Shocks in the South African Economy," Working Papers 351, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    3. Gregory Casey & Marc Klemp, 2021. "Historical Instruments and Contemporary Endogenous Regressors," Department of Economics Working Papers 2021-02, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    4. Cervellati, Matteo & Jung, Florian & Sunde, Uwe & Vischer, Thomas, 2012. "Income, Democracy, and Critical Junctures," CEPR Discussion Papers 9259, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Carolyn Chisadza and Manoel Bittencourt, 2014. "Is Democracy Eluding Sub-Saharan Africa?," Working Papers 437, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    6. Fabrice Murtin & Romain Wacziarg, 2014. "The democratic transition," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/5m0od0o9jn9, Sciences Po.
    7. Loayza, Norman & Rigolini, Jamele & Llorente, Gonzalo, 2012. "Do middle classes bring institutional reforms ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6015, The World Bank.
    8. Casey, Gregory & Klemp, Marc, 2018. "Instrumental Variables in the Long Run," CEPR Discussion Papers 12980, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Christopher J. Ellis & John Fender, 2014. "Public Sector Capital and the Transition from Dictatorship to Democracy," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 82(3), pages 322-346, June.
    10. Toman Barsbai & Hillel Rapoport & Andreas Steinmayr & Christoph Trebesch, 2014. "The Effect of Labor Migration on the Diffusion of Democracy: Evidence from a Former Soviet Republic," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01306803, HAL.
    11. Moral-Benito, Enrique & Bartolucci, Cristian, 2012. "Income and democracy: Revisiting the evidence," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 844-847.
    12. Sequeira Tiago Neves, 2017. "Democracy and income: taking parameter heterogeneity and cross-country dependency into account," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 17(2), pages 1-19, June.
    13. Martin Gassebner & Michael J. Lamla & James Raymond Vreeland, 2013. "Extreme Bounds of Democracy," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 57(2), pages 171-197, April.
    14. Gilli, Mario & Li, Yuan, 2012. "Citizenry Accountability in Autocracies: The Political Economy of Good Governance in China," Working Paper Series 2012-23, Stockholm School of Economics, China Economic Research Center.
    15. Che, Yi & Lu, Yi & Tao, Zhigang & Wang, Peng, 2013. "The impact of income on democracy revisited," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 159-169.
    16. John Anyanwu & Andrew E. O. Erhijakpor, 2013. "Working Paper 184 - Does Oil Wealth Affect Democracy in Africa?," Working Paper Series 988, African Development Bank.
    17. Nouha Bougharriou & Walid Benayed & Foued Badr Gabsi, 2016. "On the determinants of democracy in the Arab World," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 18(59), pages 25-42, March.
    18. Christian Welzel & Ronald Inglehart, 2013. "Evolution, empowerment and emancipation: How societies ascend the utility ladder of freedoms," HSE Working papers WP BRP 29/SOC/2013, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    19. Loayza, Norman & Rigolini, Jamele & Llorente, Gonzalo, 2012. "Do middle classes bring about institutional reforms?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 116(3), pages 440-444.
    20. Benhabib, Jess & Corvalan, Alejandro & Spiegel, Mark M., 2013. "Income and democracy: Evidence from nonlinear estimations," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 118(3), pages 489-492.
    21. Wadjamsse B. Djezou, 2014. "The Democracy and Economic Growth Nexus: Empirical Evidence from Côte d’Ivoire," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 11(2), pages 251-266, December.
    22. Daniel Treisman, 2011. "Income, Democracy, and the Cunning of Reason," NBER Working Papers 17132, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    23. Wantchekon, Leonard & Garcia-Ponce, Omar, 2013. "Critical Junctures: Independence Movements and Democracy in Africa," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 173, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    24. Heid, Benedikt & Langer, Julian & Larch, Mario, 2012. "Income and democracy: Evidence from system GMM estimates," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 116(2), pages 166-169.
    25. BenYishay, Ariel & Betancourt, Roger, 2014. "Unbundling democracy: Political rights and civil liberties," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 552-568.
    26. Berger, Daniel & Corvalan, Alejandro & Easterly, William & Satyanath, Shanker, 2013. "Do superpower interventions have short and long term consequences for democracy?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 22-34.
    27. Erich Gundlach & Martin Paldam, 2016. "Socioeconomic transitions as common dynamic processes," Economics Working Papers 2016-06, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    28. Manoel Bittencourt, 2012. "Yet Another Look at the Modernisation Hypothesis: Evidence from Latin America," Working Papers 201205, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    29. Seim, Anna Larsson & Parente, Stephen L., 2013. "Democracy as a middle ground: A unified theory of development and political regimes," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 35-56.
    30. Aidt, T.S. & Jensen, P.S., 2012. "From Open to Secret Ballot: Vote Buying and Modernization," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1221, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    31. Nedra Baklouti & Younes Boujelbene, 2018. "The Nexus Between Democracy and Economic Growth: Evidence from Dynamic Simultaneous-Equations Models," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 9(3), pages 980-998, September.
    32. Mario Gilli, 2012. "A Simple Model Of Repression And Revolt In Autocracies Applied To The Arab Spring," International Game Theory Review (IGTR), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 14(04), pages 1-29.
    33. Welzel, Christian, 2014. "Evolution, Empowerment, and Emancipation: How Societies Climb the Freedom Ladder," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 33-51.
    34. Pittaluga, Giovanni B. & Reghezza, Alessio & Seghezza, Elena, 2020. "Reconsidering the modernization hypothesis: The role of diversified production and interest‐group competition," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 65(C).
    35. Brückner, Markus & Gradstein, Mark, 2012. "Income Growth and Institutional Quality: Evidence from International Oil Price Shocks," CEPR Discussion Papers 8871, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

Articles

  1. Alejandro Corvalan & Pablo Querubín & Sergio Vicente, 2020. "The Political Class and Redistributive Policies," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 18(1), pages 1-48.

    Cited by:

    1. Jean Lacroix, 2020. "Ballots instead of Bullets? The effect of the Voting Rights Act on political violence," Working Papers CEB 20-007, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.

  2. Corvalan, Alejandro & Pazzona, Matteo, 2019. "Persistent commodity shocks and transitory crime effects," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 158(C), pages 110-127.

    Cited by:

    1. Ishak, Phoebe W., 2021. "Murder nature weather and violent crime in Brazil," Discussion Papers 2021/2, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.

  3. Florencia Torche & Alejandro Corvalan, 2018. "Estimating Intergenerational Mobility With Grouped Data," Sociological Methods & Research, , vol. 47(4), pages 787-811, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Gregory Clark & Andrew Leigh & Mike Pottenger, 2017. "Immobile Australia: Surnames Show Strong Status Persistence, 1870-2017," CESifo Working Paper Series 6650, CESifo.
    2. Clark, Gregory & Leigh, Andrew & Pottenger, Mike, 2020. "Frontiers of mobility: Was Australia 1870–2017 a more socially mobile society than England?," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 76(C).
    3. Adermon, Adrian & Lindahl, Mikael & Palme, Mårten, 2019. "Dynastic Human Capital, Inequality and Intergenerational Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 12300, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Solon, Gary, 2017. "What Do We Know So Far about Multigenerational Mobility?," IZA Discussion Papers 10623, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Ian Lundberg, 2020. "Does Opportunity Skip Generations? Reassessing Evidence From Sibling and Cousin Correlations," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(4), pages 1193-1213, August.

  4. Alejandro Corvalan, 2018. "How to rank rankings? Group performance in multiple-prize contests," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 51(2), pages 361-380, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Csató, László, 2021. "Pontozási rendszerek szimulációs összehasonlítása [A simulatory comparison of the points systems]," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(7), pages 847-862.
    2. Ali Raza & Muhammad Farrukh & Muhammad Khalid Iqbal & Muhammad Farhan & Yihua Wu, 2021. "Corporate social responsibility and employees' voluntary pro‐environmental behavior: The role of organizational pride and employee engagement," Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 28(3), pages 1104-1116, May.
    3. D'ora Gr'eta Petr'oczy & L'aszl'o Csat'o, 2019. "Revenue allocation in Formula One: a pairwise comparison approach," Papers 1909.12931, arXiv.org, revised Dec 2020.
    4. L'aszl'o Csat'o, 2021. "A comparative study of scoring systems by simulations," Papers 2101.05744, arXiv.org, revised Oct 2021.

  5. Corvalan, Alejandro & Cox, Paulo & Osorio, Rodrigo, 2018. "Indirect political budget cycles: Evidence from Chilean municipalities," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 1-14.

    Cited by:

    1. Carter, Virginia & Derudder, Ben & Henríquez, Cristián, 2021. "Assessing local governments’ perception of the potential implementation of biophilic urbanism in Chile: A latent class approach," Land Use Policy, Elsevier, vol. 101(C).
    2. Ziogas, Thanasis & Panagiotidis, Theodore, 2021. "Revisiting the political economy of fiscal adjustments," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 111(C).
    3. Pranab Bardhan & Sandip Mitra & Dilip Mookherjee & Anusha Nath, 2020. "How Do Voters Respond to Welfare vis-à-vis Public Good Programs? An Empirical Test for Clientelism," Staff Report 605, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    4. González, F & Muñoz, P & Prem, M, 2019. "Lost in Transition? The Persistence of Dictatorship Mayors," Documentos de Trabajo 017431, Universidad del Rosario.
    5. Jordi Sanjuán & Pau Rausell & Vicente Coll & Raül Abeledo, 2020. "Mayors, Using Cultural Expenditure in An Opportunistic Way Improves the Chances of Re-Election, but Do Not Do It: Revisiting Political Budget Cycles," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 12(21), pages 1-15, October.
    6. González-Bustamante, Bastián & Carvajal, Ariane & González, Andrea, 2019. "Determinantes del gobierno electrónico en las municipalidades: Evidencia del caso chileno," SocArXiv fze3x, Center for Open Science.
    7. Livert, Felipe & Gainza, Xabier & Acuña, Jose, 2019. "Paving the electoral way: Urban infrastructure, partisan politics and civic engagement," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 1-1.
    8. Pedro Isidoro González Ramírez & Edgar Gomez Galarza, 2020. "Federalismo fiscal y las asignaciones de transferencias en San Luis Potosí, México," Remef - Revista Mexicana de Economía y Finanzas Nueva Época REMEF (The Mexican Journal of Economics and Finance), Instituto Mexicano de Ejecutivos de Finanzas, IMEF, vol. 15(3), pages 395-413, Julio - S.
    9. Savu, A., 2021. "Reverse Political Coattails under a Technocratic Government: New Evidence on the National Electoral Benefits of Local Party Incumbency," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 2121, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    10. Lara E., Bernardo & Toro M., Sergio, 2019. "Tactical distribution in local funding: The value of an aligned mayor," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 74-89.
    11. Obadia Kyetuza Bishoge & Benatus Norbert Mvile, 2020. "The “resource curse” from the oil and natural gas sector: how can Tanzania avoid it in reality?," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 33(3), pages 389-404, October.
    12. Patricio Valdivieso & Krister P. Andersson, 2018. "What Motivates Local Governments to Invest in Critical Infrastructure? Lessons from Chile," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 10(10), pages 1-27, October.
    13. Jorge L D. Ferreira & Alexandre F. Alves & Emilie Caldeira, 2021. "Grants for Whom and Why? The Politics of Allocation of Transfers in Brazil," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 59(1), pages 39-63, March.
    14. Davide Luca, 2018. "Picking Winners at the Ballot Box: Votes and Local Economic Growth in Turkey," Working Papers 1232, Economic Research Forum, revised 10 Oct 2018.

  6. Corvalan, Alejandro & Melo, Emerson & Sherman, Robert & Shum, Matt, 2017. "Bounding Causal Effects in Ecological Inference Problems," Political Science Research and Methods, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(3), pages 555-565, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Pablo Lavado & Gonzalo Rivera, 2015. "Identifying treatment effects and counterfactual distributions using data combination with unobserved heterogeneity," Working Papers 15-14, Centro de Investigación, Universidad del Pacífico.
    2. Pablo Lavado & Gonzalo Rivera, 2016. "Identifying Treatment Effects with Data Combination and Unobserved Heterogeneity," Working Papers 2016-79, Peruvian Economic Association.

  7. Corvalan, Alejandro & Vargas, Miguel, 2015. "Segregation and conflict: An empirical analysis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 212-222.

    Cited by:

    1. Bluhm, Richard & Gassebner, Martin & Langlotz, Sarah & Schaudt, Paul, 2016. "Fueling Conflict? (De)Escalation and Bilateral Aid," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-581, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    2. Juan I Block & Rohan Dutta & David K Levine, 2021. "Leaders and Social Norms: On the Emergence of Consensus or Conflict," Levine's Working Paper Archive 786969000000001758, David K. Levine.
    3. Roberto Ezcurra & Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, 2017. "Does ethnic segregation matter for spatial inequality?," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(6), pages 1149-1178.
    4. Tilman Brück & Moritz Hennicke & Antje Schumann, 2018. "Ethnic Inequality and Forced Displacement," Working Papers ECARES 2018-27, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    5. Lévêque, Christophe & Saleh, Mohamed, 2018. "Does industrialization affect segregation? Evidence from nineteenth-century Cairo," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 40-61.
    6. Maria D. C. Garcia-Alonso & Zaki Wahhaj, 2018. "Social Diversity and Bridging Identity," Studies in Economics 1802, School of Economics, University of Kent.

  8. Contreras, Jose L. & Corvalan, Alejandro, 2014. "Olympic Games: No legacy for sports," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 122(2), pages 268-271.

    Cited by:

    1. Matthias Firgo, 2019. "The Causal Economic Effects of Olympic Games on Host Regions," WIFO Working Papers 591, WIFO.

  9. Alejandro Corvalan, 2014. "The Impact of a Marginal Subsidy on Gini Indices," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(3), pages 596-603, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Creedy, John, 2021. "Comparing Income Distributions Using Atkinson’s Measure of Inequality," Working Paper Series 9469, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    2. Laurence S. J. Roope, 2019. "Characterizing inequality benchmark incomes," Economic Theory Bulletin, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 7(1), pages 131-145, May.
    3. Laurence S J Roope, 2021. "First estimates of inequality benchmark incomes for a range of countries," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 16(3), pages 1-8, March.
    4. Creedy, John, 2014. "Interpreting Inequality Measures and Changes in Inequality," Working Paper Series 3528, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    5. Pantelis Kammas & Vassilis Sarantides, 2015. "Fiscal redistribution around elections when democracy is not “the only game in town”," Working Papers 2015019, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.

  10. Benhabib, Jess & Corvalan, Alejandro & Spiegel, Mark M., 2013. "Income and democracy: Evidence from nonlinear estimations," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 118(3), pages 489-492.

    Cited by:

    1. Guerriero, Marta, 2019. "Democracy and the Labor Share of Income: A Cross-Country Analysis," ADBI Working Papers 919, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    2. Minh Tran, Ngoc Thi & Cameron, Michael P. & Poot, Jacques, 2017. "International Migration and Institutional Quality in the Home Country: It Matters Where You Go and How Long You Stay!," IZA Discussion Papers 10945, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Casey, Gregory & Klemp, Marc, 2018. "Instrumental Variables in the Long Run," CEPR Discussion Papers 12980, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Fahad Hassan Khan, 2014. "From revenues to democracy?," Departmental Working Papers 2014-25, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
    5. Tian, Jilin & Sim, Nicholas & Yan, Wenshou & Li, Yanyun, 2020. "Trade uncertainty, income, and democracy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 21-31.
    6. Nicholas Apergis & James E. Payne, 2017. "From education to democracy: evidence from long-run time-varying estimates," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 64(4), pages 313-325, December.
    7. Parente, Stephen L. & Sáenz, Luis Felipe & Seim, Anna, 2019. "Income, Education and Democracy," Research Papers in Economics 2019:3, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
    8. Saha, Shrabani & Zhang, Zhaoyong, 2017. "Democracy-growth nexus and its interaction effect on human development: A cross-national analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 304-310.
    9. Wadjamsse B. Djezou, 2014. "The Democracy and Economic Growth Nexus: Empirical Evidence from Côte d’Ivoire," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 11(2), pages 251-266, December.
    10. Michal Madr, 2016. "Economic Development as a Factor of Democratisation: Evidence from Post-Socialist Economies," MENDELU Working Papers in Business and Economics 2016-70, Mendel University in Brno, Faculty of Business and Economics.
    11. Kotschy, Rainer & Sunde, Uwe, 2021. "Income Shocks, Inequality, and Democracy," Munich Reprints in Economics 75814, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    12. Hugo J. Faria & Hugo M. Montesinos-Yufa, 2017. "Is the Effect of Income on Democracy Heterogeneous?," Working Papers 2017-05, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    13. Zuazu, Izaskun, 2019. "The growth effect of democracy and technology: An industry disaggregated approach," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 115-131.
    14. Jess Benhabib & Alejandro Corvalen & Mark M. Spiegel, 2014. "Modernization and Discrete Measures of Democracy," Working Paper Series 2014-1, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    15. Sajad Rahimian, 2021. "The Determinants of Democracy Revisited: An Instrumental Variable Bayesian Model Averaging Approach," Papers 2103.04255, arXiv.org.
    16. Matteo Cervellati & Florian Jung & Uwe Sunde & Thomas Vischer, 2014. "Income and Democracy: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(2), pages 707-719, February.
    17. Williams, Kevin, 2017. "Do remittances improve political institutions? Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 65-75.
    18. Kemnitz, Alexander & Roessler, Martin, 2017. "Economic development, democratic institutions, and repression in non-democratic regimes: Theory and evidence," CEPIE Working Papers 04/17, Technische Universität Dresden, Center of Public and International Economics (CEPIE).
    19. Contreras, Jose L. & Corvalan, Alejandro, 2014. "Olympic Games: No legacy for sports," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 122(2), pages 268-271.
    20. Muhammad Haseeb & Muhammad Azam, 2021. "Dynamic nexus among tourism, corruption, democracy and environmental degradation: a panel data investigation," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 23(4), pages 5557-5575, April.
    21. Suzanna-Maria Paleologou, 2015. "Income and democracy: the modernization hypothesis re-visited via alternative non-linear models," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 909-921, March.
    22. Corvalan, Alejandro & Vargas, Miguel, 2015. "Segregation and conflict: An empirical analysis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 212-222.

  11. Berger, Daniel & Corvalan, Alejandro & Easterly, William & Satyanath, Shanker, 2013. "Do superpower interventions have short and long term consequences for democracy?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 22-34.

    Cited by:

    1. Carolyn Chisadza and Manoel Bittencourt, 2014. "Is Democracy Eluding Sub-Saharan Africa?," Working Papers 437, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    2. Toke S. Aidt & Facundo Albornoz & Esther Hauk, 2019. "Foreign Influence and Domestic Policy: A Survey," Working Papers 1072, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    3. Toke, A.S. & Albornoz, F. & Gassebner, M., 2012. "The Golden Hello and Political Transitions," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1241, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    4. Manoel Bittencourt, 2013. "Democracy and Education: Evidence from the Southern African Development Community," Working Papers 201387, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    5. Clayton Thyne & Kendall Hitch, 2020. "Democratic versus Authoritarian Coups: The Influence of External Actors on States’ Postcoup Political Trajectories," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 64(10), pages 1857-1884, November.
    6. Manoel Bittencourt, 2014. "Education and Fertility: Panel Time-Series Evidence from Southern Africa," Working Papers 431, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    7. Toke S Aidt & Facundo Albornoz & Esther Hauk, 2020. "Foreign influence and domestic policy," Discussion Papers 2020-01, Nottingham Interdisciplinary Centre for Economic and Political Research (NICEP).
    8. Donoghoe Mark W. & Marschner Ian C., 2015. "Flexible Regression Models for Rate Differences, Risk Differences and Relative Risks," The International Journal of Biostatistics, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 91-108, May.
    9. Manoel Bittencourt & Renee van Eyden & Monaheng Seleteng, 2013. "Inflation and Economic Growth in the SADC: Some Panel Time-Series Evidence," Working Papers 201354, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    10. Martínez, Luis R., 2017. "Transnational insurgents: Evidence from Colombia's FARC at the border with Chávez's Venezuela," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 138-153.
    11. Ahmed, Faisal Z. & Schwab, Daniel & Werker, Eric, 2021. "The political transfer problem: How cross-border financial windfalls affect democracy and civil war," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 313-339.
    12. Manoel Bittencourt & Reneé Eyden & Monaheng Seleteng, 2015. "Inflation and Economic Growth: Evidence from the Southern African Development Community," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 83(3), pages 411-424, September.

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (2) 2011-03-26 2013-10-05
  2. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (1) 2013-10-05
  3. NEP-COM: Industrial Competition (1) 2006-01-24
  4. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2013-10-05
  5. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (1) 2006-01-24
  6. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2013-10-05
  7. NEP-RMG: Risk Management (1) 2005-06-05

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