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Tamás Briglevics
(Tamas Briglevics)

Personal Details

First Name:Tamas
Middle Name:
Last Name:Briglevics
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbr638
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https://sites.google.com/site/tamasbriglevics/
Terminal Degree:2014 Department of Economics; Boston College (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Magyar Nemzeti Bank (MNB)

Budapest, Hungary
http://www.mnb.hu/
RePEc:edi:mnbgvhu (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Briglevics, Tamás & Schuh, Scott, 2014. "This is what's in your wallet... and how you use it," Working Paper Series 1684, European Central Bank.
  2. Schuh, Scott & Briglevics, Tamás, 2014. "U.S. consumer demand for cash in the era of low interest rates and electronic payments," Working Paper Series 1660, European Central Bank.
  3. Tamas Briglevics & Scott Schuh, 2014. "This is what's in your wallet... and here's how you use it," Working Papers 14-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  4. Tamas Briglevics & Oz Shy, 2012. "Why don’t most merchants use price discounts to steer consumer payment choice?," Public Policy Discussion Paper 12-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

Articles

  1. Tamás Briglevics & Oz Shy, 2014. "Why Don’t Most Merchants Use Price Discounts to Steer Consumer Payment Choice?," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 44(4), pages 367-392, June.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Tamas Briglevics & Oz Shy, 2012. "Why don’t most merchants use price discounts to steer consumer payment choice?," Public Policy Discussion Paper 12-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Mentioned in:

    1. How monetary systems cope with a multitude of dollars
      by JP Koning in Moneyness on 2015-06-25 19:34:00

Working papers

  1. Briglevics, Tamás & Schuh, Scott, 2014. "This is what's in your wallet... and how you use it," Working Paper Series 1684, European Central Bank.

    Cited by:

    1. Claire Greene & Scott Schuh & Joanna Stavins, 2017. "The 2015 Survey of Consumer Payment Choice: summary results," Research Data Report 17-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    2. John Bagnall & David Bounie & Kim P. Huynh & Anneke Kosse & Tobias Schmidt & Scott Schuh, 2016. "Consumer Cash Usage: A Cross-Country Comparison with Payment Diary Survey Data," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 12(4), pages 1-61, December.
    3. Fernando E. Alvarez & David O. Argente, 2020. "On the Effects of the Availability of Means of Payments: The Case of Uber," Working Papers 2020-173, Becker Friedman Institute for Research In Economics.
    4. Martin Brown & Nicole Hentschel & Hannes Mettler & Helmut Stix, 2020. "Financial Innovation, Payment Choice and Cash Demand – Causal Evidence from the Staggered Introduction of Contactless Debit Cards (Martin Brown,Nicole Hentschel, Hannes Mettler, Helmut Stix)," Working Papers 230, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank).
    5. Claire Greene & Brian Prescott & Oz Shy, 2021. "How People Pay Each Other: Data, Theory, and Calibrations," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2021-11, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    6. Krislert Samphantharak & Scott Schuh & Robert M. Townsend, 2018. "Integrated Household Surveys: An Assessment Of U.S. Methods And An Innovation," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 56(1), pages 50-80, January.
    7. Claire Greene & Shaun O'Brien & Scott Schuh, 2017. "U. S. consumer cash use, 2012 and 2015: an introduction to the Diary of Consumer Payment Choice," Research Data Report 17-6, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    8. Claire Greene & Joanna Stavins, 2020. "The 2017 Diary of Consumer Payment Choice," Consumer Payments Research Data Reports 2018-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    9. Claire Greene & Scott Schuh, 2014. "U.S. consumers' holdings and use of $100 bills," Research Data Report 14-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    10. Claire Greene & Oz Shy, 2020. "How Consumers Get Cash: Evidence from a Diary Survey," Consumer Payments Research Data Reports 2019-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    11. Joanna Stavins & Huijia Wu, 2017. "Payment discounts and surcharges: the role of consumer preferences," Working Papers 17-4, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    12. Gustavo A. Del Angel, 2016. "Cashless Payments and the Persistence of Cash: Open Questions About Mexico," Economics Working Papers 16108, Hoover Institution, Stanford University.
    13. Martin Brown & Nicole Hentschel & Hannes Mettler & Helmut Stix, 2020. "Financial Innovation, Payment Choice and Cash Demand - Causal Evidence from the Staggered Introduction of Contactless Debit Cards," Working Papers on Finance 2002, University of St. Gallen, School of Finance.
    14. Claire Greene & Scott Schuh & Joanna Stavins, 2016. "The 2014 survey of consumer payment choice: summary results," Research Data Report 16-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    15. Joanna Stavins, 2017. "How do consumers make their payment choices?," Research Data Report 17-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    16. Claire Greene & Scott Schuh, 2017. "The 2016 Diary of Consumer Payment Choice," Research Data Report 17-7, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    17. Scott Schuh, 2017. "Measuring consumer expenditures with payment diaries," Working Papers 17-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    18. Wang, Zhu & Wolman, Alexander L., 2016. "Payment choice and currency use: Insights from two billion retail transactions," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 94-115.

  2. Schuh, Scott & Briglevics, Tamás, 2014. "U.S. consumer demand for cash in the era of low interest rates and electronic payments," Working Paper Series 1660, European Central Bank.

    Cited by:

    1. Edoardo Rainone, 2022. "Currency demand at negative policy rates," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1359, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    2. John Bagnall & David Bounie & Kim P. Huynh & Anneke Kosse & Tobias Schmidt & Scott Schuh, 2016. "Consumer Cash Usage: A Cross-Country Comparison with Payment Diary Survey Data," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 12(4), pages 1-61, December.
    3. Camila Figueroa & Michael Pedersen, 2017. "Forecasting Demand for Denominations of Chilean Coins and Banknotes," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 799, Central Bank of Chile.
    4. Philip Gunby & Stephen Hickson, 2016. "Is Cash Dead? Using Economic Concepts To Motivate Learning and Economic Thinking," Working Papers in Economics 16/30, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    5. Camila Figueroa S. & Michael Pedersen, 2019. "A system for forecasting Chilean cash demand – the role of forecast combinations," Journal Economía Chilena (The Chilean Economy), Central Bank of Chile, vol. 22(2), pages 040-068, August.
    6. Scott L. Fulford & Scott Schuh, 2020. "Revolving versus Convenience Use of Credit Cards: Evidence from U.S. Credit Bureau Data," Working Papers 20-12, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    7. Lotz, Sebastien & Zhang, Cathy, 2015. "Money and Credit as Means of Payment: A New Monetarist Approach," MPRA Paper 64535, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Arango-Arango, Carlos A. & Bouhdaoui, Yassine & Bounie, David & Eschelbach, Martina & Hernandez, Lola, 2018. "Cash remains top-of-wallet! International evidence from payment diaries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 38-48.
    9. Bartzsch, Nikolaus & Seitz, Franz & Setzer, Ralph, 2015. "The demand for euro banknotes in Germany: Structural modelling and forecasting," MPRA Paper 64949, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Liñares-Zegarra, José M. & Willesson, Magnus, 2021. "The effects of negative interest rates on cash usage: Evidence for EU countries," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 198(C).
    11. Hiroshi Fujiki, 2020. "The use of noncash payment methods for regular payments and the household demand for cash: evidence from Japan," The Japanese Economic Review, Springer, vol. 71(4), pages 719-765, October.
    12. Jobst, Clemens & Stix, Helmut, 2017. "Doomed to Disappear? The Surprising Return of Cash Across Time and Across Countries," CEPR Discussion Papers 12327, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    13. Huynh, Kim P. & Schmidt-Dengler, Philipp & Stix, Helmut, 2014. "Whenever and Wherever: The Role of Card Acceptance in the Transaction Demand for Money," Discussion Paper Series of SFB/TR 15 Governance and the Efficiency of Economic Systems 472, Free University of Berlin, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Bonn, University of Mannheim, University of Munich.
    14. Kim Huynh & Philipp Schmidt-Dengler & Helmut Stix, 2014. "The Role of Card Acceptance in the Transaction Demand for Money," Staff Working Papers 14-44, Bank of Canada.
    15. Garín, Julio & Lastrapes, William D. & Lester, Robert, 2021. "On the welfare effects of phasing out paper currency," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 137(C).
    16. Hiroshi FUJIKI, 2020. "Attributes needed for Japan's central bank digital currency," Working Papers e151, Tokyo Center for Economic Research.
    17. Tobias Trütsch, 2020. "The impact of contactless payment on cash usage at an early stage of diffusion," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics, Springer;Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics, vol. 156(1), pages 1-35, December.
    18. Arkadiusz Manikowski, 2017. "Analysis of the denomination structure of the Polish currency in the context of the launch of the new 500 zloty banknote," Bank i Kredyt, Narodowy Bank Polski, vol. 48(5), pages 495-530.
    19. Tamás Briglevics & Scott Schuh, 2020. "This Is What's in Your Wallet...and Here's How You Use It," Working Papers 20-04, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    20. Matthew Canzoneri & Robert Cumby & Behzad Diba, 2017. "Should the Federal Reserve Pay Competitive Interest on Reserves?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 49(4), pages 663-693, June.
    21. Fujiki, Hiroshi, 2020. "Cash demand and financial literacy: A case study using Japanese survey data," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 54(C).
    22. Fujiki, Hiroshi & Tanaka, Migiwa, 2018. "How do we choose to pay using evolving retail payment technologies? Evidence from Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 85-99.

  3. Tamas Briglevics & Scott Schuh, 2014. "This is what's in your wallet... and here's how you use it," Working Papers 14-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Cited by:

    1. Fernando E. Alvarez & David O. Argente, 2020. "On the Effects of the Availability of Means of Payments: The Case of Uber," Working Papers 2020-173, Becker Friedman Institute for Research In Economics.
    2. Martin Brown & Nicole Hentschel & Hannes Mettler & Helmut Stix, 2020. "Financial Innovation, Payment Choice and Cash Demand – Causal Evidence from the Staggered Introduction of Contactless Debit Cards (Martin Brown,Nicole Hentschel, Hannes Mettler, Helmut Stix)," Working Papers 230, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank).
    3. Fernando Alvarez & David Argente & Rafael Jimenez & Francesco Lippi, 2021. "Cash: A Blessing or a Curse?," EIEF Working Papers Series 2110, Einaudi Institute for Economics and Finance (EIEF), revised May 2021.
    4. Martin Brown & Nicole Hentschel & Hannes Mettler & Helmut Stix, 2020. "Financial Innovation, Payment Choice and Cash Demand - Causal Evidence from the Staggered Introduction of Contactless Debit Cards," Working Papers on Finance 2002, University of St. Gallen, School of Finance.
    5. Wang, Zhu & Wolman, Alexander L., 2016. "Payment choice and currency use: Insights from two billion retail transactions," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 94-115.

  4. Tamas Briglevics & Oz Shy, 2012. "Why don’t most merchants use price discounts to steer consumer payment choice?," Public Policy Discussion Paper 12-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Cited by:

    1. John Bagnall & David Bounie & Kim P. Huynh & Anneke Kosse & Tobias Schmidt & Scott Schuh, 2016. "Consumer Cash Usage: A Cross-Country Comparison with Payment Diary Survey Data," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 12(4), pages 1-61, December.
    2. Stavins, Joanna & Shy, Oz, 2015. "Merchant steering of consumer payment choice: Evidence from a 2012 diary survey," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 1-9.
    3. Marie-Hélène Felt & Fumiko Hayashi & Joanna Stavins & Angelika Welte, 2020. "Distributional Effects of Payment Card Pricing and Merchant Cost Pass-through in the United States and Canada," Research Working Paper RWP 20-18, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
    4. Stavins, Joanna, 2018. "Consumer preferences for payment methods: Role of discounts and surcharges," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 35-53.
    5. Solomon H. Tarlin, 2021. "The Future of Cash," Community Affairs Discussion Paper 21-03, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    6. Jing Jian Xiao & Chunsheng Tao, 2020. "Consumer finance/household finance: the definition and scope," China Finance Review International, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 11(1), pages 1-25, June.
    7. Joanna Stavins & Huijia Wu, 2017. "Payment discounts and surcharges: the role of consumer preferences," Working Papers 17-4, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    8. Daniel Flores & Vitaliy Kalashnikov, 2017. "Parking Discounts: Price Discrimination with Different Marginal Costs," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 50(1), pages 91-103, February.
    9. Marie-Hélène Felt & Fumiko Hayashi & Joanna Stavins & Angelika Welte, 2021. "Distributional Effects of Payment Card Pricing and Merchant Cost Pass-through in Canada and the United States," Staff Working Papers 21-8, Bank of Canada.
    10. Oz Shy, 2014. "Measuring Some Effects Of The 2011 Debit Card Interchange Fee Reform," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(4), pages 769-783, October.
    11. Takanori ADACHI & Mark J. TREMBLAY, 2022. "Do No-Surcharge Rules Increase Effective Retail Prices?," Discussion papers e-22-003, Graduate School of Economics , Kyoto University.
    12. Arango, Carlos & Huynh, Kim P. & Sabetti, Leonard, 2015. "Consumer payment choice: Merchant card acceptance versus pricing incentives," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 130-141.

Articles

  1. Tamás Briglevics & Oz Shy, 2014. "Why Don’t Most Merchants Use Price Discounts to Steer Consumer Payment Choice?," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 44(4), pages 367-392, June.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-BAN: Banking (3) 2013-01-07 2014-07-21 2014-12-19
  2. NEP-MKT: Marketing (3) 2013-01-07 2014-07-21 2014-12-19

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