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Lint Barrage

Personal Details

First Name:Lint
Middle Name:
Last Name:Barrage
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pba1457
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://lintbarrage.com/

Affiliation

Economics Department
Brown University

Providence, Rhode Island (United States)
http://www.econ.brown.edu/

:


RePEc:edi:edbrous (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Laura Bakkensen & Lint Barrage, 2018. "Climate Shocks, Cyclones, and Economic Growth: Bridging the Micro-Macro Gap," NBER Working Papers 24893, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Laura A. Bakkensen & Lint Barrage, 2017. "Flood Risk Belief Heterogeneity and Coastal Home Price Dynamics: Going Under Water?," NBER Working Papers 23854, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Lint Barrage & Eric Chyn & Justine Hastings, 2014. "Advertising and Environmental Stewardship: Evidence from the BP Oil Spill," NBER Working Papers 19838, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Barrage, Lint & Lee, Min Sok, 2010. "A penny for your thoughts: Inducing truth-telling in stated preference elicitation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 106(2), pages 140-142, February.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Laura Bakkensen & Lint Barrage, 2018. "Climate Shocks, Cyclones, and Economic Growth: Bridging the Micro-Macro Gap," NBER Working Papers 24893, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Stephie Fried, 2019. "Seawalls and Stilts: A Quantitative Macro Study of Climate Adaptation," 2019 Meeting Papers 898, Society for Economic Dynamics.

  2. Laura A. Bakkensen & Lint Barrage, 2017. "Flood Risk Belief Heterogeneity and Coastal Home Price Dynamics: Going Under Water?," NBER Working Papers 23854, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Olga Filippova & Cuong Nguyen & Ilan Noy & Michael Rehm, 2019. "Who cares? Future sea-level-rise and house prices," CESifo Working Paper Series 7595, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Cohen, Jeffrey P. & Danko, Joseph J. & Yang, Ke, 2019. "Proximity to a water supply reservoir and dams: Is there spatial heterogeneity in the effects on housing prices?," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 14-22.
    3. Amine Ouazad & Matthew E. Kahn, 2019. "Mortgage Finance in the Face of Rising Climate Risk," NBER Working Papers 26322, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Kahn, Matthew E. & Zhao, Daxuan, 2018. "The impact of climate change skepticism on adaptation in a market economy," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 251-262.
    5. Matthew Gibson & Jamie T. Mullins & Alison Hill, 2019. "Climate Risk and Beliefs: Evidence from New York Floodplains," Department of Economics Working Papers 2019-02, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    6. Robert Engle & Stefano Giglio & Heebum Lee & Bryan Kelly & Johannes Stroebel, 2019. "Hedging climate change news," CESifo Working Paper Series 7655, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Indaco, Agustín & Ortega, Francesc & Taspinar, Süleyman, 2018. "The Effects of Flood Insurance on Housing Markets," IZA Discussion Papers 11810, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Ortega, Francesc & Taṣpınar, Süleyman, 2018. "Rising sea levels and sinking property values: Hurricane Sandy and New York’s housing market," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 81-100.
    9. Koffi Akakpo & Marie-Amélie Boucher & Vincent Boucher, 2018. "Optimal Credible Warnings," Cahiers de recherche 1813, Centre de recherche sur les risques, les enjeux économiques, et les politiques publiques.
    10. Filippova, Olga & Nguyen, Cuong & Noy, Ilan & Rehm, Michael, 2019. "Who cares? Future sea-level-rise and house prices," Working Paper Series 8158, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    11. Robert F. Engle III & Stefano Giglio & Bryan T. Kelly & Heebum Lee & Johannes Stroebel, 2019. "Hedging Climate Change News," NBER Working Papers 25734, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Indaco, Agustín & Ortega, Francesc & Taspinar, Süleyman, 2019. "Hurricanes, Flood Risk and the Economic Adaptation of Businesses," IZA Discussion Papers 12474, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  3. Lint Barrage & Eric Chyn & Justine Hastings, 2014. "Advertising and Environmental Stewardship: Evidence from the BP Oil Spill," NBER Working Papers 19838, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Zhongmin Wang & Cheng Xu, 2016. "Using Donations to the Green Party to Measure Community Environmentalism," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 36(3), pages 1784-1790.
    2. Cano-Urbina, Javier & Clapp, Christopher M. & Willardsen, Kevin, 2019. "The effects of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill on housing markets," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 131-156.
    3. Wang, Zhongmin & Lee, Alvin & Polonsky, Michael, 2015. "Egregiousness and Boycott Intensity: Evidence from the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill," Discussion Papers dp-15-06, Resources For the Future.
    4. Ben Gilbert & Alexander James & Jason Shogren, 2017. "Corporate Apology for Environmental Damage," Working Papers 2017-02, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
    5. Harrison Hong & Inessa Liskovich, 2015. "Crime, Punishment and the Halo Effect of Corporate Social Responsibility," NBER Working Papers 21215, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Anthony Heyes & Marcel Oestreich, 2017. "The Optimal NGO Chief: Strategic Delegation in Social Advocacy," Working Papers 1701, Brock University, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Barrage, Lint & Lee, Min Sok, 2010. "A penny for your thoughts: Inducing truth-telling in stated preference elicitation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 106(2), pages 140-142, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Helga Fehr-Duda & Robin Schimmelpfennig, 2018. "Wider die Zahlengläubigkeit: Sind Befragungsergebnisse eine gute Grundlage für wirtschaftspolitische Entscheidungen?," ECON - Working Papers 297, Department of Economics - University of Zurich, revised Dec 2018.
    2. Penn, Jerrod & Hu, Wuyang, 2016. "Making the Most of Cheap Talk in an Online Survey," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 236171, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Bosworth Ryan & Taylor Laura O., 2012. "Hypothetical Bias in Choice Experiments: Is Cheap Talk Effective at Eliminating Bias on the Intensive and Extensive Margins of Choice?," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-28, December.
    4. Jacob Ladenburg & Søren Bøye Olsen, 2010. "Augmenting short Cheap Talk scripts with a repeated Opt-Out Reminder in Choice Experiment surveys," IFRO Working Paper 2010/9, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food and Resource Economics.
    5. Haghani, Milad & Sarvi, Majid, 2018. "Hypothetical bias and decision-rule effect in modelling discrete directional choices," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 361-388.
    6. Anna Kukla-Gryz & Joanna Tyrowicz & Michał Krawczyk & Konrad Siwiński, 2015. "We all do it, but are we willing to admit? Incentivizing digital pirates' confessions," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(3), pages 184-188, February.
    7. Schmidt, Robert J., 2019. "Capitalizing on the (false) consensus effect: Two tractable methods to elicit private information," Working Papers 0669, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    8. Michal Krawczyk & Anna Kukla-Gryz & Joanna Tyrowicz, 2015. "Digital piracy and the perception of price fairness," Working Papers 2015-24, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    9. Matthew Quaife & Fern Terris-Prestholt & Gian Luca Di Tanna & Peter Vickerman, 2018. "How well do discrete choice experiments predict health choices? A systematic review and meta-analysis of external validity," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 19(8), pages 1053-1066, November.
    10. Mohammed H. Alemu & Søren B. Olsen, 2017. "Can a Repeated Opt-Out Reminder remove hypothetical bias in discrete choice experiments? An application to consumer valuation of novel food products," IFRO Working Paper 2017/05, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food and Resource Economics.
    11. Jacob Ladenburg & Jens Olav Dahlgaard & Ole Bonnichsen, 2010. "Testing the Effect of a Short Cheap Talk Script in Choice Experiments," IFRO Working Paper 2010/11, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food and Resource Economics.
    12. Penn, Jerrod & Hu, Wuyang, 2019. "Cheap talk efficacy under potential and actual Hypothetical Bias: A meta-analysis," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 22-35.
    13. Pierre-Alexandre Mahieu & Romain Crastes & Jordan Louviere & Ewa Zawojska, 2016. "Rewarding truthful-telling in stated preference studies," Working Papers 2016-33, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (3) 2014-02-02 2017-10-01 2018-08-27
  2. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (1) 2014-02-02
  3. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (1) 2018-08-27
  4. NEP-MKT: Marketing (1) 2014-02-02
  5. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2017-10-01

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