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Tilahun Temesgen

Personal Details

First Name:Tilahun
Middle Name:
Last Name:Temesgen
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RePEc Short-ID:pte150
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

(in no particular order)

International Bank for Reconstruction & Development (IBRD)
World Bank Group

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.worldbank.org/html/extdr/backgrd/ibrd/




RePEc:edi:ibrdwus (more details at EDIRC)

Economics Research
World Bank Group

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://econ.worldbank.org/research

(202) 477-1234

1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
RePEc:edi:dvewbus (more details at EDIRC)

Finance and Private Sector Research
World Bank Group

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://econ.worldbank.org/programs/finance




RePEc:edi:fwrlbus (more details at EDIRC)

Macroeconomics and Growth Research
World Bank Group

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.worldbank.org/programs/macroeconomics/



1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
RePEc:edi:egrwbus (more details at EDIRC)

International Development Association (IDA)
World Bank Group

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.worldbank.org/ida/




RePEc:edi:idawbus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Keun Lee & Tilahun Temesgen, 2009. "What makes firms grow in developing countries? An extension of the resource-based theory of firm growth and empirical analysis," International Journal of Technological Learning, Innovation and Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 2(3), pages 139-172.
  2. Lisa Giddings & Mieke Meurs & Tilahun Temesgen, 2007. "Changing Preschool Enrolments in Post-Socialist Central Asia: Causes and Implications," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 49(1), pages 81-100, March.
  3. Tilahun Temesgen, 2006. "Decomposing Gender Wage Differentials in Urban Ethiopia: Evidence from Linked Employer-Employee (LEE) Manufacturing Survey Data," Global Economic Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(1), pages 43-66.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Keun Lee & Tilahun Temesgen, 2009. "What makes firms grow in developing countries? An extension of the resource-based theory of firm growth and empirical analysis," International Journal of Technological Learning, Innovation and Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 2(3), pages 139-172.

    Cited by:

    1. Tilman Altenburg & Aimée Hampel-Milagrosa & Markus Loewe, 2017. "A Decade On: How Relevant is the Regulatory Environment for Micro and Small Enterprise Upgrading After All?," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 29(2), pages 457-475, April.

  2. Lisa Giddings & Mieke Meurs & Tilahun Temesgen, 2007. "Changing Preschool Enrolments in Post-Socialist Central Asia: Causes and Implications," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 49(1), pages 81-100, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Tilman Brück & Damir Esenaliev & Antje Kroeger & Alma Kudebayeva & Bakhrom Mirkasimov & Susan Steiner, 2012. "Household Survey Data for Research on Well-Being and Behavior in Central Asia," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1257, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Landmann, Andreas & Seitz, Helke & Steiner, Susan, 2017. "Patrilocal Residence and Female Labour Supply," IZA Discussion Papers 10890, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Andreas Landmann & Helke Seitz & Susan Steiner, 2017. "Patrilocal Residence and Female Labour Supply," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1705, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    4. Louise Grogan & Katerina Koka, 2010. "Young children and women's labour force participation in Russia, 1992-2004," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 18(4), pages 715-739, October.
    5. Habibov, Nazim N., 2012. "Does childcare have an impact on the quality of parent–child interaction? Evidence from post-Soviet Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(12), pages 2367-2373.
    6. Habibov, Nazim, 2012. "Early childhood care and education attendance in Central Asia," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 798-806.
    7. Maria S. Floro & Mieke Meurs, 2010. "Gender Equality at the Heart of Decent Work," Working Papers 2010-01, American University, Department of Economics.
    8. Landmann, Andreas & Seitz, Helke & Steiner, Susan, 2017. "Intergenerational Coresidence and Female Labour Supply," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168282, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

  3. Tilahun Temesgen, 2006. "Decomposing Gender Wage Differentials in Urban Ethiopia: Evidence from Linked Employer-Employee (LEE) Manufacturing Survey Data," Global Economic Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(1), pages 43-66.

    Cited by:

    1. Christophe Nordman & Faly Rakotomanana & Anne-Sophie Robilliard, 2009. "Gender Disparities in the Malagasy Labour Market," Working Papers DT/2009/08, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    2. World Bank, 2009. "Unleashing the Potential of Ethiopian Women : Trends and Options for Economic Empowerment," World Bank Other Operational Studies 18862, The World Bank.
    3. Christophe Nordman & Anne-Sophie Robilliard & François Roubaud, 2009. "Decomposing Gender and Ethnic Earnings Gaps in Seven West African Cities," Working Papers DT/2009/07, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    4. Unte, Pia & Kemper, Niels, 2015. "Culture and the formation of gender-specific skills in an agrarian society," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113002, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    5. Christophe J. Nordman & François-Charles Wolff, 2009. "Gender differences in pay in African manufacturing firms," Working Papers hal-00421227, HAL.
    6. Richard U. Agesa & Jacqueline Agesa & Andrew Dabalen, 2013. "Sources of the Persistent Gender Wage Gap along the Unconditional Earnings Distribution: Findings from Kenya," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(1), pages 76-103, March.
    7. Nordman, Christophe J. & Robilliard, Anne-Sophie & Roubaud, François, 2011. "Gender and ethnic earnings gaps in seven West African cities," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(S1), pages 132-145.

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

Corrections

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