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Emily Kerr

Personal Details

First Name:Emily
Middle Name:
Last Name:Kerr
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pke189
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

(in no particular order)

Economic Research Department
Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas

Dallas, Texas (United States)
http://www.dallasfed.org/research.cfm




RePEc:edi:efrbdus (more details at EDIRC)

Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas

Dallas, Texas (United States)
http://www.dallasfed.org/




RePEc:edi:frbdaus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Jesus Cañas & Emily Kerr, 2014. "Texas Manufacturing Outlook Survey: survey methodology and performance," Working Papers 1416, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.

Articles

  1. Emily Kerr & Keith R. Phillips & Judy Teng, 2021. "COVID-19 Slammed into Texas, Leaving Long-Lasting Impacts," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue First Qua.
  2. Emily Kerr & Pia M. Orrenius & Christopher Slijk, 2018. "New Technology Boosts Texas Firms' Output, Alters Worker Mix," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q3, pages 3-6.
  3. Emily Kerr, 2017. "What’s Driving Wide Gap Between Cattle and Beef Prices?," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q2, pages 15-15.
  4. Jesus Cañas & Emily Kerr & Pia M. Orrenius & Jack Wang, 2014. "Fed manufacturing surveys provide insight into national economy," Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, vol. 9(12), pages 1-4, October.
  5. Emily Kerr, 2012. "Brutal drought depresses agriculture, thwarting U.S. and Texas economies," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q4, pages 10-13.
  6. Jesus Cañas & Emily Kerr, 2011. "Spotlight: Texas service sector outlook survey completing the regional economic picture," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q2, pages 1-15.
  7. Emily Kerr & Keith R. Phillips, 2011. "Texas economy to ride higher in the saddle in 2011," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q1, pages 3-7.
  8. Emily Kerr, 2010. "Noteworthy: Texas agriculture: drought's end brings optimism," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q2, pages 1-15.
  9. Robert W. Gilmer & Emily Kerr, 2010. "Natural gas from shale: Texas revolution goes global," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q3, pages 10-13.
  10. Emily Kerr, 2010. "Noteworthy: Texas exports: NAFTA markets spur trade turnaround," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q1, pages 1-15.
  11. Emily Kerr & Pia M. Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2010. "Texas' Latino pay gaps: taking a closer look," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q1, pages 10-13.
  12. Emily Kerr, 2009. "Noteworthy: household income: Texas posts gain in otherwise tough year," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q4, pages 1-15.
  13. Emily Kerr & Keith R. Phillips, 2009. "Spotlight: Farm real estate values: Texas holds steady in 2008, bucking U.S. trend," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q4, pages 1-10.
  14. Emily Kerr & Pia M. Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2009. "Getting to the bottom of Texas' Latino pay gap," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q4, pages 3-7.
  15. Emily Kerr, 2009. "Noteworthy: venture capital: U.S. rises, but Texas continues its decline," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q3, pages 1-14.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Jesus Cañas & Emily Kerr, 2014. "Texas Manufacturing Outlook Survey: survey methodology and performance," Working Papers 1416, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.

    Cited by:

    1. Jesus Cañas & Amy Jordan, 2018. "Texas Service Sector Outlook Survey: Survey Methodology and Performance," Working Papers 1807, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.

Articles

  1. Robert W. Gilmer & Emily Kerr, 2010. "Natural gas from shale: Texas revolution goes global," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q3, pages 10-13.

    Cited by:

    1. Fang, Guochang & Tian, Lixin & Yang, Zili, 2020. "The construction of a comprehensive multidimensional energy index," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(C).
    2. Justin Caron & Stuart M. Cohen & Maxwell Brown & John M. Reilly, 2018. "Exploring The Impacts Of A National U.S. Co2 Tax And Revenue Recycling Options With A Coupled Electricity-Economy Model," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 9(01), pages 1-40, February.
    3. Wei, Yi-Ming & Kang, Jia-Ning & Yu, Bi-Ying & Liao, Hua & Du, Yun-Fei, 2017. "A dynamic forward-citation full path model for technology monitoring: An empirical study from shale gas industry," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 205(C), pages 769-780.
    4. Centner, Terence J., 2016. "Reducing pollution at five critical points of shale gas production: Strategies and institutional responses," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 40-46.
    5. Peters, Jeffrey C., 2017. "Natural gas and spillover from the US Clean Power Plan into the Paris Agreement," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 41-47.
    6. Weihong Peng & Menglin Du & Feng Gao & Xuan Dong & Hongmei Cheng, 2018. "A New Analysis Model for Potential Contamination of a Shallow Aquifer from a Hydraulically-Fractured Shale," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(11), pages 1-22, November.
    7. Ringsmuth, Andrew K. & Landsberg, Michael J. & Hankamer, Ben, 2016. "Can photosynthesis enable a global transition from fossil fuels to solar fuels, to mitigate climate change and fuel-supply limitations?," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 134-163.
    8. Wang, Qiang & Chen, Xi & Jha, Awadhesh N. & Rogers, Howard, 2014. "Natural gas from shale formation – The evolution, evidences and challenges of shale gas revolution in United States," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 1-28.
    9. Øglend, Atle & Osmundsen, Petter & Kleppe, Tore Selland, 2015. "Trade with Endogenous Transportation Costs: The Value of LNG Exports," UiS Working Papers in Economics and Finance 2015/5, University of Stavanger.
    10. Wang, Qiang & Jiang, Feng, 2019. "Integrating linear and nonlinear forecasting techniques based on grey theory and artificial intelligence to forecast shale gas monthly production in Pennsylvania and Texas of the United States," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 178(C), pages 781-803.
    11. Xin Chang & Yintong Guo & Jun Zhou & Xuehang Song & Chunhe Yang, 2018. "Numerical and Experimental Investigations of the Interactions between Hydraulic and Natural Fractures in Shale Formations," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(10), pages 1-27, September.
    12. Atle Oglend & Petter Osmundsen & Tore Selland Kleppe, 2015. "Trade with Endogenous Transportation Costs: The Value of LNG Exports," CESifo Working Paper Series 5222, CESifo.
    13. Oglend, Atle & Kleppe, Tore Selland & Osmundsen, Petter, 2016. "Trade with endogenous transportation costs: The case of liquefied natural gas," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 138-148.
    14. Middleton, Richard S. & Carey, J. William & Currier, Robert P. & Hyman, Jeffrey D. & Kang, Qinjun & Karra, Satish & Jiménez-Martínez, Joaquín & Porter, Mark L. & Viswanathan, Hari S., 2015. "Shale gas and non-aqueous fracturing fluids: Opportunities and challenges for supercritical CO2," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 500-509.

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