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Janet Dzator

Personal Details

First Name:Janet
Middle Name:
Last Name:Dzator
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pdz28
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

(50%) College of Human and Social Futures
University of Newcastle

Callaghan, Australia
https://www.newcastle.edu.au/college/human-and-social-futures
RePEc:edi:fenewau (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) Business School
College of Human and Social Futures
University of Newcastle

Callaghan, Australia
http://www.newcastle.edu.au/school/business/
RePEc:edi:ednwcau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Mpho Bosupeng & Janet Dzator & Andrew Nadolny, 2019. "Wechselkursfehlausrichtung und Kapitalflucht ab Botswana: Ein Cointegrationsansatz mit Risikoschwellen [Exchange Rate Misalignment and Capital Flight from Botswana: A Cointegration Approach with Ri," Post-Print hal-02168726, HAL.

Articles

  1. Acheampong, Alex O. & Dzator, Janet & Shahbaz, Muhammad, 2021. "Empowering the powerless: Does access to energy improve income inequality?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(C).
  2. Mpho Bosupeng & Janet Dzator & Andrew Nadolny, 2019. "Exchange Rate Misalignment and Capital Flight from Botswana: A Cointegration Approach with Risk Thresholds," JRFM, MDPI, vol. 12(2), pages 1-26, June.
  3. Elsa Alexandra Licumba & Janet Dzator & Xiaohe Zhang, 2016. "Health and economic growth: are there gendered effects?: Evidence from selected southern Africa development community region," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 50(5), pages 215-227, Special I.
  4. Janet Dzator & Michael Dzator & Felix Asante & Clement Ahiadeke, 2016. "Common mental disorders, economic growth and development: Economic consequences and measurement issues," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 50(5), pages 13-26, Special I.
  5. William Sheng Liu & Frank Wogbe Agbola & Janet Ama Dzator, 2016. "The impact of FDI spillover effects on total factor productivity in the Chinese electronic industry: a panel data analysis," Journal of the Asia Pacific Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(2), pages 217-234, April.
  6. Michael Dzator & Janet Dzator, 2016. "Health, emergency facilities and development: Locating facilities to serve people and development better," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 50(5), pages 131-142, Special I.
  7. Anh Tru Nguyen & Janet Dzator & Andrew Nadolny, 2015. "Does contract farming improve productivity and income of farmers? A review of theory and evidence," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 49(6), pages 531-538, Special I.
  8. Elsa Alexandra Licumba & Janet Dzator & James Xiaohe Zhang, 2015. "Gender equality in education and economic growth in selected Southern African countries," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 49(6), pages 349-360, Special I.
  9. Janet Dzator* & Rui Chen, 2015. "Sustaining development and poverty reduction: Promoting growth where it counts," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 49(6), pages 1-14, Special I.
  10. Dzator, Janet & Asafu-Adjaye, John, 2004. "A study of malaria care provider choice in Ghana," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 389-401, September.
  11. Asafu-Adjaye, John & Dzator, Janet, 2003. "Willingness to Pay for Malaria Insurance: A Case Study of Households in Ghana Using the Contingent Valuation Method," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 31-47, March.
  12. Asenso-Okyere, W. K. & Dzator, Janet A., 1997. "Household cost of seeking malaria care. A retrospective study of two districts in Ghana," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 45(5), pages 659-667, September.
  13. W. Asenso-Okyere & Janet Dzator & Isaac Osel-akoto, 1996. "The behaviour towards malaria care—a multinomial logit approach," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 167-186, January.
    RePEc:unt:japsdj:v:25:y:2018:i:1:p:109-145 is not listed on IDEAS

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

    Sorry, no citations of working papers recorded.

Articles

  1. Mpho Bosupeng & Janet Dzator & Andrew Nadolny, 2019. "Exchange Rate Misalignment and Capital Flight from Botswana: A Cointegration Approach with Risk Thresholds," JRFM, MDPI, vol. 12(2), pages 1-26, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Johane Motsatsi, 2020. "How Non-Diamond Exports Respond to Exchange Rate Volatility in Botswana," Working Papers 77, Botswana Institute for Development Policy Analysis.

  2. William Sheng Liu & Frank Wogbe Agbola & Janet Ama Dzator, 2016. "The impact of FDI spillover effects on total factor productivity in the Chinese electronic industry: a panel data analysis," Journal of the Asia Pacific Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(2), pages 217-234, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Hoang Duong Vu & Le Van Hung, 2017. "FDI Spill-Overs, Absorptive Capacity and Domestic Firms' Technical Efficiency in Vietnamese Wearing Apparel Industry," Acta Universitatis Agriculturae et Silviculturae Mendelianae Brunensis, Mendel University Press, vol. 65(3), pages 1075-1084.
    2. Huang, Junbing & Cai, Xiaochen & Huang, Shuo & Tian, Sen & Lei, Hongyan, 2019. "Technological factors and total factor productivity in China: Evidence based on a panel threshold model," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 271-285.
    3. Hu, Dengfeng & You, Kefei & Esiyok, Bulent, 2021. "Foreign direct investment among developing markets and its technological impact on host: Evidence from spatial analysis of Chinese investment in Africa," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 166(C).
    4. Duong, Vu Hoang, 2020. "The threshold of absorptive capacity: The case of Vietnamese manufacturing firms," International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 163(C), pages 44-57.
    5. Razzaq, Asif & An, Hui & Delpachitra, Sarath, 2021. "Does technology gap increase FDI spillovers on productivity growth? Evidence from Chinese outward FDI in Belt and Road host countries," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 172(C).
    6. Claudiu ALBULESCU & Camélia TURCU, 2020. "Productivity, Financial Performance, and Corporate Governance: Evidence from Romanian R&D Firms," LEO Working Papers / DR LEO 2846, Orleans Economics Laboratory / Laboratoire d'Economie d'Orleans (LEO), University of Orleans.
    7. Hui Wang & Huifang Liu, 2017. "An Empirical Research of FDI Spillovers and Financial Development Threshold Effects in Different Regions of China," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 9(6), pages 1-21, June.

  3. Anh Tru Nguyen & Janet Dzator & Andrew Nadolny, 2015. "Does contract farming improve productivity and income of farmers? A review of theory and evidence," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 49(6), pages 531-538, Special I.

    Cited by:

    1. Thanh Thu Do, "undated". "A Review Of The Role Of Collectors In Vietnams Rice Value Network," Review of Socio - Economic Perspectives 201713, Reviewsep.
    2. Kryszak, Łukasz & Staniszewski, Jakub, 2017. "The Elasticity of Agricultural Income in the EU Member States Under Different Cost Structures," Problems of World Agriculture / Problemy Rolnictwa Światowego, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, vol. 17(32, Part ), December.
    3. Ton, Giel & Vellema, Wytse & Desiere, Sam & Weituschat, Sophia & D'Haese, Marijke, 2018. "Contract farming for improving smallholder incomes: What can we learn from effectiveness studies?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 46-64.

  4. Elsa Alexandra Licumba & Janet Dzator & James Xiaohe Zhang, 2015. "Gender equality in education and economic growth in selected Southern African countries," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 49(6), pages 349-360, Special I.

    Cited by:

    1. Giscard Assoumou-ella, 2019. "Gender Inequality in Education and per capita GDP: the case of CEMAC Countries," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 39(2), pages 1154-1162.
    2. Laura Cabeza-García & Esther B. Del Brio & Mery Luz Oscanoa-Victorio, 2018. "Gender Factors and Inclusive Economic Growth: The Silent Revolution," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 10(1), pages 1-14, January.

  5. Janet Dzator* & Rui Chen, 2015. "Sustaining development and poverty reduction: Promoting growth where it counts," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 49(6), pages 1-14, Special I.

    Cited by:

    1. Ingutia, Rose & Rezitis, Anthony N. & Sumelius, John, 2020. "Child poverty, status of rural women and education in sub Saharan Africa," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 111(C).

  6. Dzator, Janet & Asafu-Adjaye, John, 2004. "A study of malaria care provider choice in Ghana," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 389-401, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Wiseman, Virginia & Scott, Anthony & Conteh, Lesong & McElroy, Brendan & Stevens, Warren, 2008. "Determinants of provider choice for malaria treatment: Experiences from The Gambia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(4), pages 487-496, August.
    2. Priscilla Nduku Wangai & Amos Njuguna & Joseph Ngugi, 2019. "Analysis of health seeking behaviour on effective delivery of health services under capitation scheme in Kenya," International Journal of Research in Business and Social Science (2147-4478), Center for the Strategic Studies in Business and Finance, vol. 8(6), pages 129-136, October.
    3. Syed Masud Ahmed & Shamim Hossain & Md. Kamruzzaman, 2010. "Exploring Explanatory Model of Malaria in Hill Tracts of Bangladesh: Perspective from Dighinala Upazila," Working Papers id:2709, eSocialSciences.
    4. Takahiro Tsukahara & Takuma Sugahara & Seiritsu Ogura & Francis Wanak Hombhanje, 2019. "Effect of pecuniary costs and time costs on choice of healthcare providers among caregivers of febrile children in rural Papua New Guinea," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 1-14, December.
    5. Trani, Jean-Francois & Bakhshi, Parul & Noor, Ayan A. & Lopez, Dominique & Mashkoor, Ashraf, 2010. "Poverty, vulnerability, and provision of healthcare in Afghanistan," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(11), pages 1745-1755, June.
    6. Srivastava, Divya & McGuire, Alistair, 2015. "Patient access to health care and medicines across low-income countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 21-27.
    7. May Sudhinaraset & Matthew Ingram & Heather Kinlaw Lofthouse & Dominic Montagu, 2013. "What Is the Role of Informal Healthcare Providers in Developing Countries? A Systematic Review," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 8(2), pages 1-12, February.
    8. Anta TA DIAL & Moussa DIENG & Martine AUDIBERT & Jean-Yves LE HESRAN, 2014. "Déterminants de la demande de soins en milieu péri-urbain dans un contexte de subvention à Pikine, Sénégal," Working Papers 201415, CERDI.
    9. P. M. Amegbor, 2017. "An Assessment of Care-Seeking Behavior in Asikuma-Odoben-Brakwa District: A Triple Pluralistic Health Sector Approach," SAGE Open, , vol. 7(2), pages 21582440177, June.

  7. Asafu-Adjaye, John & Dzator, Janet, 2003. "Willingness to Pay for Malaria Insurance: A Case Study of Households in Ghana Using the Contingent Valuation Method," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 31-47, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Y Mehmet Kutluay & Richard S. J. Tol, 2015. "Valuing malaria morbidity: Results from a global metaanalysis," Working Paper Series 7615, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.

  8. Asenso-Okyere, W. K. & Dzator, Janet A., 1997. "Household cost of seeking malaria care. A retrospective study of two districts in Ghana," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 45(5), pages 659-667, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Alemayehu Hailu & Bernt Lindtjørn & Wakgari Deressa & Taye Gari & Eskindir Loha & Bjarne Robberstad, 2017. "Economic burden of malaria and predictors of cost variability to rural households in south-central Ethiopia," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 12(10), pages 1-16, October.
    2. Charles C. Ezenduka & Daniel Resende Falleiros & Brian B. Godman, 2017. "Evaluating the Treatment Costs for Uncomplicated Malaria at a Public Healthcare Facility in Nigeria and the Implications," PharmacoEconomics - Open, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 185-194, September.
    3. Axel Demenet, 2016. "Health Shocks and Permanent Income Loss: the Household Business Channel," Working Papers DT/2016/11, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    4. Schaefer, K. Aleks, 2016. "Anti-Malarial Biotechnology, Drug Resistance, and the Dynamics of Disease Management," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 235716, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Haenssgen, Marco J. & Ariana, Proochista, 2017. "The Social Implications of Technology Diffusion: Uncovering the Unintended Consequences of People’s Health-Related Mobile Phone Use in Rural India and China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 286-304.
    6. Philip Dalinjong & Alexander Laar, 2012. "The national health insurance scheme: perceptions and experiences of health care providers and clients in two districts of Ghana," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 1-13, December.
    7. Lesong Conteh & Edith Patouillard & Margaret Kweku & Rosa Legood & Brian Greenwood & Daniel Chandramohan, 2010. "Cost Effectiveness of Seasonal Intermittent Preventive Treatment Using Amodiaquine & Artesunate or Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine in Ghanaian Children," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 5(8), pages 1-11, August.
    8. Dzator, Janet & Asafu-Adjaye, John, 2004. "A study of malaria care provider choice in Ghana," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 389-401, September.
    9. Obinna Onwujekwe & Nkoli Uguru & Enyi Etiaba & Ifeanyi Chikezie & Benjamin Uzochukwu & Alex Adjagba, 2013. "The Economic Burden of Malaria on Households and the Health System in Enugu State Southeast Nigeria," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 8(11), pages 1-5, November.
    10. Laxminarayan, Ramanan, 2003. "ACT Now or Later: The Economics of Malaria Resistance," Discussion Papers 10699, Resources for the Future.
    11. A.R. Abdul-Aziz & E. Harris & L. Munyakazi, 2012. "Risk Factors In Malaria Mortality Among Children In Northern Ghana: A Case Study At The Tamale Teaching Hospital," International Journal of Business and Social Research, LAR Center Press, vol. 2(5), pages 35-45, October.
    12. A.R. Abdul-Aziz & E. Harris & L. Munyakazi, 2012. "Risk Factors In Malaria Mortality Among Children In Northern Ghana: A Case Study At The Tamale Teaching Hospital," International Journal of Business and Social Research, MIR Center for Socio-Economic Research, vol. 2(5), pages 35-45, October.
    13. Dillon, Andrew & Friedman, Jed & Serneels, Pieter, 2014. "Health Information, Treatment, and Worker Productivity: Experimental Evidence from Malaria Testing and Treatment among Nigerian Sugarcane Cutters," IZA Discussion Papers 8074, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    14. Tin Su & Steffen Flessa, 2013. "Determinants of household direct and indirect costs: an insight for health-seeking behaviour in Burkina Faso," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 14(1), pages 75-84, February.
    15. Amanda Ross & Nicolas Maire & Elisa Sicuri & Thomas Smith & Lesong Conteh, 2011. "Determinants of the Cost-Effectiveness of Intermittent Preventive Treatment for Malaria in Infants and Children," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 6(4), pages 1-12, April.
    16. Powell-Jackson, Timothy & Hanson, Kara & Whitty, Christopher J.M. & Ansah, Evelyn K., 2014. "Who benefits from free healthcare? Evidence from a randomized experiment in Ghana," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 305-319.
    17. Su, Tin Tin & Sanon, Mamadou & Flessa, Steffen, 2007. "Assessment of indirect cost-of-illness in a subsistence farming society by using different valuation methods," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 83(2-3), pages 353-362, October.
    18. Laxminarayan, Ramanan, 2003. "ACT Now or Later: The Economics of Malaria Resistance," Discussion Papers dp-03-51, Resources For the Future.
    19. Chima, Reginald Ikechukwu & Goodman, Catherine A. & Mills, Anne, 2003. "The economic impact of malaria in Africa: a critical review of the evidence," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 17-36, January.
    20. Ebere Akobundu & Jing Ju & Lisa Blatt & C. Mullins, 2006. "Cost-of-Illness Studies," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 24(9), pages 869-890, September.
    21. McIntyre, Diane & Thiede, Michael & Dahlgren, Göran & Whitehead, Margaret, 2006. "What are the economic consequences for households of illness and of paying for health care in low- and middle-income country contexts?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(4), pages 858-865, February.
    22. P. M. Amegbor, 2017. "An Assessment of Care-Seeking Behavior in Asikuma-Odoben-Brakwa District: A Triple Pluralistic Health Sector Approach," SAGE Open, , vol. 7(2), pages 21582440177, June.
    23. Catherine A. Goodman & Paul G. Coleman & Anne J. Mills, 2001. "Changing the first line drug for malaria treatment—cost‐effectiveness analysis with highly uncertain inter‐temporal trade‐offs," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(8), pages 731-749, December.
    24. Onwujekwe, Obinna & Chima, Reginald & Okonkwo, Paul, 2000. "Economic burden of malaria illness on households versus that of all other illness episodes: a study in five malaria holo-endemic Nigerian communities," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 143-159, November.

  9. W. Asenso-Okyere & Janet Dzator & Isaac Osel-akoto, 1996. "The behaviour towards malaria care—a multinomial logit approach," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 167-186, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Asenso-Okyere, W. Kwadwo & Osei-Akoto, Isaac & Anum, Adote & Appiah, Ernest N., 1997. "Willingness to pay for health insurance in a developing economy. A pilot study of the informal sector of Ghana using contingent valuation," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 223-237, December.
    2. Dzator, Janet & Asafu-Adjaye, John, 2004. "A study of malaria care provider choice in Ghana," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 389-401, September.
    3. Srivastava, Divya & McGuire, Alistair, 2015. "Patient access to health care and medicines across low-income countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 21-27.
    4. Hentschel, Jesko, 1998. "Distinguishing between types of data and methods of collecting them," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1914, The World Bank.

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