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Open-Economy Politics: The Political Economy of the World Coffee Trade

Author

Listed:
  • Robert H. Bates

    (Department of Government, Harvard University)

Abstract

Coffee is traded in one of the few international markets ever subject to effective political regulation. In Open-Economy Politics, Robert Bates explores the origins, the operations, and the collapse of the International Coffee Organization, an international "government of coffee" that was formed in the 1960s. In so doing, he addresses key issues in international political economy and comparative politics, and analyzes the creation of political institutions and their impact on markets. Drawing upon field work in East Africa, Colombia, and Brazil, Bates explores the domestic sources of international politics within a unique theoretical framework that blends game theoretic and more established approaches to the study of politics. The book will appeal to those interested in international political economy, comparative politics, and the political economy of development, especially in Latin America and Africa, and to readers wanting to learn more about the economic and political realities that underlie the coffee market. It is also must reading for those interested in "the new institutionalism" and modern political economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert H. Bates, 1998. "Open-Economy Politics: The Political Economy of the World Coffee Trade," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 6067.
  • Handle: RePEc:pup:pbooks:6067
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Waterbury, John, 1999. "The Long Gestation and Brief Triumph of Import-Substituting Industrialization," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 323-341, February.
    2. Mauricio Cárdenas Santa María & Roberto Junguito & Mónica Pachón, 2005. "Political institutions and policy outcomes in Colombia: the effects of the 1991 Constitution," WORKING PAPERS SERIES. DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO 003344, FEDESARROLLO.
    3. Bobonis, Gustavo J. & Morrow, Peter M., 2014. "Labor coercion and the accumulation of human capital," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 32-53.
    4. Mauricio Cardenas & Zeinab Partow, 1998. "Oil, Coffee and the Dynamic Commons Problems in Colombia," Research Department Publications 3033, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    5. Gomez, Miguel I. & Castillo, Mauricio, 2001. "Structural Change, Rents Transferring And Market Power In The International Coffee Market: A Time Series Analysis," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20441, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    6. Gomez, Miguel I. & Koerner, Julia, 2009. "Do retail coffee prices increase faster than they fall? Asymmetric price transmission in France, Germany and the United States," Working Papers 55930, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    7. Jarvis, Lovell S., 2003. "How Brazil Transferred Billions To Foreign Coffee Importers: The International Coffee Agreement, Rent Seeking And Export Tax Rebates," Working Papers 11967, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    8. David Lake, 2009. "Open economy politics: A critical review," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 219-244, September.
    9. Lewis, Colin M., 2005. "States and markets in Latin America: the political economy of economic intervention," Economic History Working Papers 22483, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    10. Houston, Jack E. & Santillan, Manlio & Marlowe, Julia, 2003. "U.S. Demand For Mild Coffees: Implications For Mexican Coffee," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 34(01), March.
    11. Sasha C. Breger Bush, 2010. "The World Bank’s approach to increasing the vulnerability of small coffee producers," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 11310, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    12. Mehta, Aashish & Chavas, Jean-Paul, 2008. "Responding to the coffee crisis: What can we learn from price dynamics?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(1-2), pages 282-311, February.
    13. repec:ilo:ilowps:462097 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Calfat, Germán & Flôres Junior, Renato Galvão, 2002. "Government actions to support coffee producers - an investigation of possible measures from the European Union," FGV/EPGE Economics Working Papers (Ensaios Economicos da EPGE) 448, FGV/EPGE - Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
    15. Oran Young, 2003. "Environmental Governance: The Role of Institutions in Causing and Confronting Environmental Problems," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 3(4), pages 377-393, December.
    16. Kennedy, P. Lynn & Roule, Elizabeth D., 2004. "Creole Coffee," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 7(02).
    17. Dye, Alan & Sicotte, Richard, 2006. "How brinkmanship saved Chadbourne: Credibility and the International Sugar Agreement of 1931," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 223-256, April.
    18. Jarvis, Lovell S., 2005. "The rise and decline of rent-seeking activity in the Brazilian coffee sector: Lessons from the imposition and removal of coffee export quotas," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(11), pages 1881-1903, November.

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