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The Lost Art of Economics

Author

Listed:
  • David Colander

Abstract

The essays explore the forces in academic institutions that have led economics to its current position, as well as the implications of the lost art for the economics profession and its future. In the end, the author is positive about the future of the profession, and predicts that in 2050 it will no longer be as Solow suggested it currently is – ‘the overeducated in pursuit of the unknowable’. Instead it will be the ‘appropriately educated in search of the knowable’.

Suggested Citation

  • David Colander, 2001. "The Lost Art of Economics," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2415, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eebook:2415
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    File URL: http://www.e-elgar.com/shop/isbn/9781840646948
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:kap:jbuset:v:154:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1007_s10551-017-3442-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Cedrini, Mario & Fontana, Magda, 2015. "Mainstreaming. Reflections on the Origins and Fate of Mainstream Pluralism," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201510, University of Turin.
    3. Matthew Drennan, 2006. "Economics: Diminishing Marginal Utility," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(5), pages 71-91.
    4. David Colander, 2003. "Integrating Sex and Drugs into the Principles Course: Market-Failures Versus Failures-of-Market Outcomes," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1), pages 82-91, January.
    5. Thomas Mayer, 2012. "Ziliak and McClosky?s Criticisms of Significance Tests: A Damage Assessment," Working Papers 61, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
    6. Alex Millmow, 2010. "The Changing Sociology of the Australian Academic Economics Profession," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 29(1), pages 87-95, March.
    7. Thomas Mayer, 2012. "Ziliak and McClosky?s Criticisms of Significance Tests: A Damage Assessment," Working Papers 126, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
    8. David Colander, 2004. "Thinking Outside the Heterodox Box: Post Walrasian Macroeconomics and Heterodoxy," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0424, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
    9. Thomas Mayer, 2012. "Ziliak and McCloskey's Criticisms of Significance Tests: An Assessment," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 9(3), pages 256-297, September.
    10. Craig Freedman, 2003. "Do Great Economists Make Great Teachers? George Stigler as a Dissertation Supervisor," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(3), pages 282-290, January.
    11. Dave Colander, 2008. "The Myth of the Myth of the Rational Voter," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0807, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economics and Finance;

    JEL classification:

    • G0 - Financial Economics - - General
    • E0 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General

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