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Multi-dimensional Review of Uruguay. Volume 1: initial assessment

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Abstract

Improvements in living standards and outcomes that matter for people’s quality of life are essential for economic and social development. Since the economic crisis of 2002 Uruguay has made significant progress in this direction, while also increasing its integration in the global economy. This has translated into higher growth rates and a reduction in inequalities. Uruguay has chosen its own path in terms of policies for development, compared to other Latin American countries and the OECD. The country’s particular mix of policies shows that there is no single “model” of development. However, the country must address several challenges to maintain momentum and ensure a sustainable path of economic growth in a changing global economy. Over the past few years, the OECD and ECLAC have analysed in depth the challenges of development to establish how these organisations can best meet the needs of policy makers, and ultimately the citizens they serve. This analysis formed part of an OECD strategy on development, which called upon the Organisation to adapt its analytical framework, policy tools and instruments, so as to enhance its contribution to global development.

Suggested Citation

  • -, 2014. "Multi-dimensional Review of Uruguay. Volume 1: initial assessment," Coediciones, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), number 37080 edited by Cepal.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecr:col013:37080
    Note: Includes bibliography.
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    File URL: http://repositorio.cepal.org/handle/11362/37080
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    References listed on IDEAS

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