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Perfecting Parliament

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  • Congleton,Roger D.

Abstract

This book explains why contemporary liberal democracies are based on historical templates rather than revolutionary reforms; why the transition in Europe occurred during a relatively short period in the nineteenth century; why politically and economically powerful men and women voluntarily supported such reforms; how interests, ideas, and pre-existing institutions affected the reforms adopted; and why the countries that liberalized their political systems also produced the Industrial Revolution. The analysis is organized in three parts. The first part develops new rational choice models of (1) governance, (2) the balance of authority between parliaments and kings, (3) constitutional exchange, and (4) suffrage reform. The second part provides historical overviews and detailed constitutional histories of six important countries. The third part provides additional evidence in support of the theory, summarizes the results, contrasts the approach taken in this book with that of other scholars, and discusses methodological issues.

Suggested Citation

  • Congleton,Roger D., 2011. "Perfecting Parliament," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521151696.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521151696
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    Cited by:

    1. Aidt, Toke & Albornoz, Facundo & Gassebner, Martin, 2010. "The Golden Halo and Political Transitions," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Hannover 2010 48, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    2. Aidt, Toke S. & Jensen, Peter S., 2014. "Workers of the world, unite! Franchise extensions and the threat of revolution in Europe, 1820–1938," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 52-75.
    3. repec:eee:poleco:v:49:y:2017:i:c:p:108-122 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Stephan Wolf & Nils Goldschmidt & Thomas Petersen, 2015. "Votes on behalf of children: a legitimate way of giving them a voice in politics?," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 356-374, September.
    5. Toke Aidt & Peter Jensen, 2013. "Democratization and the size of government: evidence from the long 19th century," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 157(3), pages 511-542, December.
    6. Aidt, T.S. & Jensen, P.S., 2012. "From Open to Secret Ballot: Vote Buying and Modernization," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1221, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    7. Nikolova, Elena & Nikolova, Milena, 2017. "Suffrage, labour markets and coalitions in colonial Virginia," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 108-122.
    8. Congleton, Roger D. & Yoo, Dongwoo, 2014. "A Test of the Unraveling Hypothesis: Constitutional Bargaining and the Quality of African Institutions," CEI Working Paper Series 2014-4, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    9. Frederik Toscani, 2013. "Why High Human Capital Makes Good Revolutionaries: The Role of the Middle Classes in Democratisation," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1332, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    10. Mueller, Dennis C., 2011. "Entrepreneurship and Growth," Ratio Working Papers 170, The Ratio Institute.

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