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Bank borrowing constraints and the demand for trade credit: evidence from panel data

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  • Christina V. Atanasova

    (Leeds University Business School, UK)

  • Nicholas Wilson

    (Credit Management Research Centre, Leeds University Business School, UK)

Abstract

Monetary policy contractions exacerbate credit constraints stemming from asymmetric information, incentive problems and limited collateral. During such periods financial intermediaries reduce the supply of credit to smaller businesses. Although trade credit is a less desirable alternative of corporate financing, it may play a special role in alleviating credit rationing. This paper is an empirical investigation of the interaction of monetary policy, credit market conditions and corporate financing over the business cycle. It provides a simple test of the existence of a credit channel of monetary policy transmissions. Using individual firm data we find that during periods of tight money the proportion of bank-borrowing constrained firms increases. Borrowing constrained films are found to substitute away from bank credit to trade credit. Such evidence supports the existence of a credit channel of monetary policy transmission: firms do not voluntarily cut bank loans (e.g. because of demand slowdown) since they increase their demand for a less desirable alternative (trade credit). Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Christina V. Atanasova & Nicholas Wilson, 2003. "Bank borrowing constraints and the demand for trade credit: evidence from panel data," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(6-7), pages 503-514.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:mgtdec:v:24:y:2003:i:6-7:p:503-514
    DOI: 10.1002/mde.1134
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eee:riibaf:v:42:y:2017:i:c:p:559-571 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Sangeeta Pratap & Carlos Urrutia & Felipe Meza, 2017. "Credit, Misallocation and Productivity Growth: A Disaggregated Analysis," 2017 Meeting Papers 538, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Ketskeméty, László & Pálinkó, Éva & Szabó, Márta, 2010. "Kereskedelmi hitelt alakító paraméterek a magyarországi feldolgozóipari vállalatok körében
      [Parameters for commercial credit among Hungary's manufacturing companies]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(11), pages 994-1012.
    4. Nielen, Sebastian, 2013. "Product Innovation and Trade Credit Demand and Supply: Evidence from European Countries," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79997, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    5. Yajing Liu & Kenya Fujiwara, 2017. "Financial Crises, Bank Lending, and Trade Credit:Evidence from Chinese Enterprises," Discussion Papers 2017-25, Kobe University, Graduate School of Business Administration.
    6. Altunok, Fatih & Mitchell, Karlyn & Pearce, Douglas, 2015. "The trade credit channel and monetary policy transmission: empirical evidence from U.S. panel data," MPRA Paper 66273, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Anna Białek-Jaworska & Natalia Nehrebecka, 2015. "Rola kredytu handlowego w finansowaniu przedsiębiorstw," Gospodarka Narodowa, Warsaw School of Economics, issue 5, pages 33-64.
    8. Akbar, Saeed & Rehman, Shafiq ur & Ormrod, Phillip, 2013. "The impact of recent financial shocks on the financing and investment policies of UK private firms," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 59-70.
    9. repec:enr:rpaper:0001 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Natalia Nehrebecka & Aneta Dzik-Walczak, 2016. "Publication selection bias in the sources of financing the enterprises research? A Meta-Regression Analysis," Working Papers 2016-02, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    11. colantonio emiliano & mattoscio nicola & odoardi iacopo & perrucci antonella, 2014. "Credit And Economic Development: Structural Differences Among The Italian Regions," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(1), pages 500-509, July.

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