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State regulations and the availability of child-care services

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  • William T. Gormley

Abstract

Most state regulations do not adversely affect the availability of regulated day-care services. However, regulations differ in their costliness, intrusiveness, and enforceability. Costly regulations may reduce the number of group day-care centers, and intrusive regulations may reduce the number of family day-care homes. Unenforceable regulations have no apparent effects. In some instances, regulators face trade-offs between quality and availability. However, requirements for provider training and limitations on group size do not involve such trade-offs. More broadly, improvements in the regulatory process may result in quality gains without reductions in availability.

Suggested Citation

  • William T. Gormley, 1991. "State regulations and the availability of child-care services," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(1), pages 78-95.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:10:y:1991:i:1:p:78-95 DOI: 10.2307/3325514
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John M. Quigley, 1990. "Does rent control cause homelessness? taking the claim seriously," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(1), pages 89-93.
    2. Mayo, Stephen K., 1981. "Theory and estimation in the economics of housing demand," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 95-116, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Queralt, Magaly & Witte, Ann D., 1999. "Childcare regulations: A method to pursue social welfare goals?," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 111-146, February.
    2. V. Joseph Hotz & Mo Xiao, 2005. "The Impact of Minimum Quality Standards on Firm Entry, Exit and Product Quality: The Case of the Child Care Market," Working Papers 05-28, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    3. Bastos, Paulo & Cristia, Julian, 2012. "Supply and quality choices in private child care markets: Evidence from São Paulo," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(2), pages 242-255.
    4. Elizabeth Rigby & Rebecca M. Ryan & Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, 2007. "Child care quality in different state policy contexts," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(4), pages 887-908.
    5. Blau, David & Currie, Janet, 2006. "Pre-School, Day Care, and After-School Care: Who's Minding the Kids?," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
    6. David M. Blau, 2003. "Do child care regulations affect the child care and labor markets?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(3), pages 443-465.
    7. V. Joseph Hotz & Mo Xiao, 2011. "The Impact of Regulations on the Supply and Quality of Care in Child Care Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 1775-1805, August.
    8. Mario Cuevas & Sigfrido Lee & Bismarck Pineda, 2010. "Industrial Policy in Guatemala: A Case of Policy Inertia under Changing Paradigms," Research Department Publications 4694, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    9. Mulligan, James G. & Hoffman, Saul D., 1998. "Daycare Quality and Regulation: A Queuing-Theoretic Approach," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 1-13, February.
    10. David M. Blau & H. Naci Mocan, 2002. "The Supply Of Quality In Child Care Centers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(3), pages 483-496, August.
    11. Tasneem Chipty & Ann Dryden Witte, 1994. "Economic Effects of Quality Regulations in the Daycare Industry," NBER Working Papers 4953, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Paulo Bastos & Julian P. Cristia, 2010. "Entry and Quality Choices in Child Care Markets," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 3029, Inter-American Development Bank.
    13. Blau, David M., 2007. "Unintended consequences of child care regulations," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 513-538, June.
    14. L. Lambertini & C. Scarpa, 1999. "Minimum Quality Standards and Predatory Behaviour," Working Papers 353, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    15. Haizhen Lin, 2010. "Do Minimum Quality Standards Improve Quality? A Case Study of the Nursing Home Industry," Working Papers 2010-01, Indiana University, Kelley School of Business, Department of Business Economics and Public Policy.

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