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Public-private partnerships in developing countries: are infrastructures responding to the new ODA strategy?


  • Argentino Pessoa

    (Faculdade de Economia, Universidade do Porto, Portugal)


The developing world needs far more financing for infrastructure than can be provided by domestic public finances alone and through Official Development Aid (ODA). Around middle 1980s a new strategy based on the use of public-private agreements, relying on ODA to enhance the quality of projects, reduce risks and raise profitability was gradually implemented for the provision of infrastructures and public utilities. This paper evaluates the more typical forms of private sector involvement (PSI) and its actual importance (by type of public utility and by region) and shows that the new strategy has failed in improving the provision of infrastructures in the developing world. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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  • Argentino Pessoa, 2008. "Public-private partnerships in developing countries: are infrastructures responding to the new ODA strategy?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(3), pages 311-325.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:20:y:2008:i:3:p:311-325 DOI: 10.1002/jid.1416

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Richard Franceys & Almud Weitz, 2003. "Public-private community partnerships in infrastructure for the poor," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(8), pages 1083-1098.
    2. John Luiz, 2006. "The New Partnership for African Development: questions regarding Africa's response to its underdevelopment," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(2), pages 223-236.
    3. Santosh Mehrotra, 2006. "Governance and basic social services: ensuring accountability in service delivery through deep democratic decentralization," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(2), pages 263-283.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:17:y:2008:i:22:p:1-11 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Ana Elena IOSIF, 2014. "Public - private interdependence: an effective tool in water supply services," EuroEconomica, Danubius University of Galati, issue 2(33), pages 19-35, November.
    3. Argentino Pessoa, 2010. "Reviewing Public–Private Partnership Performance in Developing Economies," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Public–Private Partnerships, chapter 25 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Argentino Pessoa, 2008. "Do the Malthusian fears ever die? A note on the recent increase in food prices," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 17(22), pages 1-11.

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