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Pregnancy persistently reduces alcohol purchases: Causal evidence from scanner data

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  • Aljoscha Janssen
  • Elle Parslow

Abstract

We analyze household‐level changes in alcohol consumption in response to pregnancy. Using scanner data, we identify households with a pregnant household member. Within an event study and a dynamic difference‐in‐differences estimation, we find that during a first pregnancy, households reduce their alcohol purchases by 36%. After pregnancy, purchases of alcohol are 34% lower than before pregnancy. We do not find any effect during the second pregnancy. One possible explanation for our result is that lower consumption during pregnancy changes habits and reduces consumption in the long term. We discuss other explanations and comment on policy implications.

Suggested Citation

  • Aljoscha Janssen & Elle Parslow, 2021. "Pregnancy persistently reduces alcohol purchases: Causal evidence from scanner data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(2), pages 231-247, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:30:y:2021:i:2:p:231-247
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.4188
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    1. Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 8th March 2021
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2021-03-08 12:00:01

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