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Waiting time and doctor shopping in a mixed medical economy

  • Raymond Y.T. Yeung
  • Gabriel M. Leung
  • Sarah M. McGhee
  • Janice M. Johnston

    (Department of Community Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, China)

Registered author(s):

    Waiting time generally acts as a rationing mechanism in the public health care system. In theory, patients who have a higher valuation of time are more likely to seek alternative care (i.e. doctor shopping) if there is a parallel private sector than those who have weaker time preference. However, the existing settings of many health care systems do not allow patients to reveal their preference of such. The data presented in this study suggest a positive association between patients' expressed value of time and doctor shopping behaviour in Hong Kong. Patients who were assigned longer waiting times relative to their expected horizon were more likely to seek private alternative care. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.871
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    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

    Volume (Year): 13 (2004)
    Issue (Month): 11 ()
    Pages: 1137-1144

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    Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:13:y:2004:i:11:p:1137-1144
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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    5. Johannesson, Magnus & Johansson, Per-Olov & Söderqvist, Tore, 1997. "Time Spent on Waiting Lists for Medical Care: An Insurance Approach," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 192, Stockholm School of Economics.
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    7. Stéphane Luchini & Christel Protière & Jean-Paul Moatti, 2003. "Eliciting several willingness to pay in a single contingent valuation survey: application to health care," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(1), pages 51-64.
    8. Bishai, David M. & Lang, Hui Chu, 2000. "The willingness to pay for wait reduction: the disutility of queues for cataract surgery in Canada, Denmark, and Spain," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 219-230, March.
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    10. Hamilton, Barton H & Bramley-Harker, Robert Edward, 1999. "The Impact of the NHS Reforms on Queues and Surgical Outcomes in England: Evidence from Hip Fracture Patients," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(457), pages 437-62, July.
    11. Nichols, D & Smolensky, E & Tideman, T N, 1971. "Discrimination by Waiting Time in Merit Goods," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 61(3), pages 312-23, June.
    12. Besley, Timothy & Hall, John & Preston, Ian, 1999. "The demand for private health insurance: do waiting lists matter?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 155-181, May.
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    14. Hanning, Marianne & Spangberg, Ulrika Winblad, 2000. "Maximum waiting time -- a threat to clinical freedom?: Implementation of a policy to reduce waiting times," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 15-32, May.
    15. Seung-Hoon Yoo & Seung-Jun Kwak & Tai-Yoo Kim, 2001. "Modelling willingness to pay responses from dichotomous choice contingent valuation surveys with zero observations," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(4), pages 523-529.
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