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The Dynamics of Preference Elicitation after an Environmental Disaster: Stability and Emotional Load

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  • Carmelo J. León
  • Jorge E. Araña

Abstract

Nonmarket valuation is commonly applied to infer the preferences of individuals for restoration policies after an environmental disaster. A crucial issue in this task is to determine the appropriate lapse of time after which the valuation techniques should be applied. This study investigates the role of the emotional load in explaining the dynamic patterns of elicited preferences. The results show that preferences tend to stabilize when the emotional load is also stable. The main implication is that attitudinal investigation of emotions could provide satisfactory information for determining the time frame for implementing more costly nonmarket valuation studies.

Suggested Citation

  • Carmelo J. León & Jorge E. Araña, 2012. "The Dynamics of Preference Elicitation after an Environmental Disaster: Stability and Emotional Load," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 88(2), pages 362-381.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:88:y:2012:ii:1:p:362-381
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. León, Carmelo J. & Araña, Jorge E. & Hanemann, W. Michael & Riera, Pere, 2014. "Heterogeneity and emotions in the valuation of non-use damages caused by oil spills," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 129-139.
    2. Parsons, George R. & Myers, Kelley, 2016. "Fat tails and truncated bids in contingent valuation: An application to an endangered shorebird species," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 129(C), pages 210-219.
    3. Carmelo León & Jorge Araña & Javier León, 2013. "Correcting for Scale Perception Bias in Measuring Corruption: an Application to Chile and Spain," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 114(3), pages 977-995, December.
    4. Gebeyehu Fetene & Søren Olsen & Ole Bonnichsen, 2014. "Disentangling the Pure Time Effect From Site and Preference Heterogeneity Effects in Benefit Transfer: An Empirical Investigation of Transferability," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 59(4), pages 583-611, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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