IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/uwp/landec/v86y2010i2p313-328.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Minerals, Institutions, Openness, and Growth: An Empirical Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • James L. Butkiewicz
  • Halit Yanikkaya

Abstract

Competing explanations of the resource curse are tested using panel data. The data support the existence of a mineral resource curse for developing countries with weak institutions, consistent with the hypothesis that owners of mineral resources use weak institutions and openness to trade to stifle the development of human capital, to the detriment of growth in other sectors of the economy. Manufacturing imports substitute for the development of domestic production, so openness to trade correlates with lower growth in mineral dependent economies. The "Dutch disease" and debt overhang explanations of the resource curse are not supported.

Suggested Citation

  • James L. Butkiewicz & Halit Yanikkaya, 2010. "Minerals, Institutions, Openness, and Growth: An Empirical Analysis," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 86(2), pages 313-328.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:86:y:2010:i:2:p:313-328
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://le.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/86/2/313
    Download Restriction: A subscripton is required to access pdf files. Pay per article is available.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Auty, Richard M., 1994. "Industrial policy reform in six large newly industrializing countries: The resource curse thesis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 11-26, January.
    2. Barro, Robert J. & Lee, Jong-Wha, 2005. "IMF programs: Who is chosen and what are the effects?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(7), pages 1245-1269, October.
    3. Atkinson, Giles & Hamilton, Kirk, 2003. "Savings, Growth and the Resource Curse Hypothesis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(11), pages 1793-1807, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Fubing Su & Guoxue Wei & Ran Tao, 2016. "China and Natural Resource Curse in Developing Countries: Empirical Evidence from a Cross-country Study," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 24(1), pages 18-40, January.
    2. Amin Karimu & George Adu & George Marbuah & Justice Tei Mensah & Franklin Amuakwa-Mensah, 2017. "Natural Resource Revenues and Public Investment in Resource-rich Economies in Sub-Saharan Africa," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(4), pages 107-130, November.
    3. repec:agr:journl:v:3(612):y:2017:i:3(612):p:173-192 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Graham Davis, 2011. "The resource drag," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 155-176, June.
    5. Jayakar, Krishna & Martin, Brandie, 2012. "Regulatory governance in African telecommunications: Testing the resource curse hypothesis," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 691-703.
    6. Arsham Reisinezhad, 2018. "Economic Growth and Income Inequality in Resource Countries: Theory and Evidence," PSE Working Papers halshs-01707976, HAL.
    7. Graham A. Davis, 2012. "Replicating "Sources of Slow Growth in African Economies"," Working Papers 2012-09, Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business.
    8. Graham A. Davis, 2012. "Replicating Sachs and Warner: The 1997 Working Paper," Working Papers 2012-08, Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business.
    9. MAGDEFRAU Melissa & THOMAS Snyder, 2013. "Natural Resources And International Capital Flows," Studies in Business and Economics, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 8(3), pages 56-71, Decembre.
    10. Nuno Torres & Óscar Afonso & Isabel Soares, 2013. "A survey of literature on the resource curse: critical analysis of the main explanations, empirical tests and resource proxies," CEF.UP Working Papers 1302, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • Q32 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Exhaustible Resources and Economic Development

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:86:y:2010:i:2:p:313-328. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://le.uwpress.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.