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Informal Care and the Division of End-of-Life Transfers

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  • Meta Brown

Abstract

Unmarried parents in the AHEAD study derive the majority of their longterm care hours from their children, and childcaregivers are generally unpaid. This paper examines the extent to which the division of end-of-life transfers compensates caregiving children. In a model of siblings’ altruistic contribution of care to a shared parent, the parent’s estate division is found to influence total family care, even where care contingencies are unenforced. Evidence in the AHEAD data that end-of-life transfers favor both current and expected caregivers, and that children make altruistic but resourceconstrained caregiving decisions, is consistent with a theory of estate division in which planned end-of-life transfers elicit care from altruistic children.

Suggested Citation

  • Meta Brown, 2006. "Informal Care and the Division of End-of-Life Transfers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(1).
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:41:y:2006:i:1:p191-219
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joseph G. Altonji & Todd E. Elder & Christopher R. Taber, 2005. "Selection on Observed and Unobserved Variables: Assessing the Effectiveness of Catholic Schools," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 151-184, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marco Francesconi & Robert A. Pollak & Domenico Tabasso, 2015. "Unequal Bequests," Research Papers by the Institute of Economics and Econometrics, Geneva School of Economics and Management, University of Geneva 15013, Institut d'Economie et Econométrie, Université de Genève.
    2. Elenka Brenna & Cinzia Novi, 2016. "Is caring for older parents detrimental to women’s mental health? The role of the European North–South gradient," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 745-778, December.
    3. repec:bla:ecorec:v:93:y:2017:i:302:p:395-419 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Olena Nizalova, 2012. "The Wage Elasticity of Informal Care Supply: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Study," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 79(2), pages 350-366, October.
    5. Mariacristina De Nardi & Eric French & John Bailey Jones, 2016. "Savings After Retirement: A Survey," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 8(1), pages 177-204, October.
    6. Michelle Sovinsky & Steven Stern, 2016. "Dynamic modelling of long-term care decisions," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 463-488, June.
    7. Michelle Goeree & Bridget Hiedemann & Steven Stern, 2011. "Will You Still Want Me Tomorrow? The Dynamics of Families' Long-Term Care Arrangements," Working Papers 2011-035, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    8. Lara Gardner & Donna B. Gilleskie, 2012. "The Effects of State Medicaid Policies on the Dynamic Savings Patterns and Medicaid Enrollment of the Elderly," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 47(4), pages 1082-1127.
    9. Ha Trong Nguyen & Luke B. Connelly, 2017. "The Dynamics of Informal Care Provision in an Australian Household Panel Survey: Previous Work Characteristics and Future Care Provision," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 93(302), pages 395-419, September.
    10. repec:uwp:jhriss:v:52:y:2017:i:2:p:531-572 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Joris Ghysels, 2011. "The provision of informal childcare by European grandparents: constraints versus selective preferences," Working Papers 1108, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    12. Jeffrey R. Brown & Amy Finkelstein, 2009. "The Private Market for Long-Term Care Insurance in the United States: A Review of the Evidence," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 76(1), pages 5-29.
    13. Meta Brown & John Karl Scholz & Ananth Seshadri, 2012. "A New Test of Borrowing Constraints for Education," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(2), pages 511-538.
    14. Christine Ho, 2015. "Grandchild care, intergenerational transfers, and grandparents’ labor supply," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 359-384, June.
    15. Max Groneck & Frederic Krehl, 2014. "Bequests and Informal Long-Term Care: Evidence from the HRS Exit Interviews," Working Paper Series in Economics 79, University of Cologne, Department of Economics.
    16. HAMAAKI Junya & HORI Masahiro & MURATA Keiko, 2016. "The Intra-Family Division of Bequests and Bequest Motives: Empirical Evidence from a Survey on Japanese Households," ESRI Discussion paper series 333, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    17. Meghan M. Skira, 2015. "Dynamic Wage And Employment Effects Of Elder Parent Care," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 56, pages 63-93, February.
    18. repec:esx:essedp:759 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Ribar, David C. & Wilhelm, Mark O., 2006. "Exchange, role modeling and the intergenerational transmission of elder support attitudes: Evidence from three generations of Mexican-Americans," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 514-531, June.
    20. Francisca M. Antman, 2012. "Elderly Care and Intrafamily Resource Allocation when Children Migrate," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 47(2), pages 331-363.

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