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Annual Hours and Weeks in a Life-Cycle Labor Supply Model: Canadian Evidence on Male Behavior

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  • Reilly, Kevin T

Abstract

Estimates of the intertemporal labor supply behavior of males in Canada using micro data are reported. Individuals make the intertemporal labor supply decision on the basis of annual hours and weeks. Precision of the parameter estimates is improved by using tenure variables as instruments for the wage. Further, the age and tenure variables are allowed to have taste parameters in the structural equations. The evidence suggests that this is required only for the two age variables. Elasticity evidence suggests that evolutionary changes in the wage cause changes in the number of weeks with the elasticity being 0.6 and statistically significant. Copyright 1994 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Reilly, Kevin T, 1994. "Annual Hours and Weeks in a Life-Cycle Labor Supply Model: Canadian Evidence on Male Behavior," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(3), pages 460-477, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:12:y:1994:i:3:p:460-77
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    Cited by:

    1. Osberg, Lars, 1995. "Le chainon manquant : donnees sur l'element demande des marches du travail," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 1995077f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
    2. Jorge González-Chapela, 2007. "On the Price of Recreation Goods as a Determinant of Male Labor Supply," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 795-824.
    3. John C. Ham & Kevin T. Reilly, 2013. "Implicit Contracts, Life Cycle Labor Supply, And Intertemporal Substitution," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 54, pages 1133-1158, November.
    4. Bessho, Shun-ichiro & Hayashi, Masayoshi, 2011. "Labor supply response and preferences specification: Estimates for prime-age males in Japan," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 398-411, October.
    5. Jorge Gonzalez Chapela, 2011. "Recreation, home production, and intertemporal substitution of female labor supply: evidence on the intensive margin," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 14(3), pages 532-548, July.
    6. Jones, John Bailey, 2002. "Has fiscal policy helped stabilize the postwar U.S. economy?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 709-746, May.
    7. Shun-ichiro Bessho & Masayoshi Hayashi, 2005. "The CES utility function, non-linear budget constraints and labor supply : results on prime-age males in Japan," Labor Economics Working Papers 21911, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    8. John C. Ham & Kevin T. Reilly, 2002. "Testing Intertemporal Substitution, Implicit Contracts, and Hours Restriction Models of the Labor Market Using Micro Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 905-927, September.
    9. Osberg, Lars, 1995. "The Missing Link - Data on the Demand Side of Labour Markets," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1995077e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    10. Black, Dan A. & Kolesnikova, Natalia & Taylor, Lowell J., 2014. "Why do so few women work in New York (and so many in Minneapolis)? Labor supply of married women across US cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 59-71.
    11. repec:eee:moneco:v:95:y:2018:i:c:p:32-48 is not listed on IDEAS

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