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Imputation in U.S. Manufacturing Data and Its Implications for Productivity Dispersion

Author

Listed:
  • T. Kirk White

    (Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau)

  • Jerome P. Reiter

    (Duke University)

  • Amil Petrin

    (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities and NBER)

Abstract

In the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2002 and 2007 Censuses of Manufactures, 79% and 73% of observations, respectively, have imputed data for at least one variable used to compute total factor productivity (TFP). The bureau primarily imputes for missing values using mean-imputation methods, which can reduce the underlying variance of the imputed variables. For five variables entering TFP, we show that dispersion is significantly smaller in the Census mean-imputed versus the nonimputed data. We use classification and regression trees (CART) to produce multiple imputations with observed data for similar plants. For 90% of the 473 industries in 2002 and 84% of the 471 industries in 2007, we find that TFP dispersion increases as we move from Census mean-imputed data to nonimputed data to the CART-imputed data.

Suggested Citation

  • T. Kirk White & Jerome P. Reiter & Amil Petrin, 2018. "Imputation in U.S. Manufacturing Data and Its Implications for Productivity Dispersion," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 100(3), pages 502-509, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:100:y:2018:i:3:p:502-509
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Grossman, Gene M. & Helpman, Elhanan & Oberfield, Ezra & Sampson, Thomas, 2017. "The productivity slowdown and the declining labor share: a neoclassical exploration," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86597, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Pierce, Justin R. & Schott, Peter K., 2018. "Investment responses to trade liberalization: Evidence from U.S. industries and establishments," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 203-222.
    3. Juana Sanchez & Sydney Noelle Kahmann, 2017. "R&D, Attrition and Multiple Imputation in BRDIS," Working Papers 17-13, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C80 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - General
    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms
    • L60 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - General

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