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On regional growth convergence in Great Britain

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  • Andrew Henley

Abstract

Henley A. (2005) On regional growth convergence in Great Britain, Regional Studies 39 , 1245-1260. This paper examines recent sub-regional output data for Great Britain to identify possible economic convergence. It concludes that sub-regional data are subject to substantial spatial autocorrelation. Conventional estimates of 'beta' convergence are subject to misspecification bias if spatial autocorrelation is not taken into account. Unconditional models fail to find any evidence for economic convergence - indeed, the most recent data point to significant economic divergence. Conditional models, controlling for region-specific steady-states and the influence of human capital accumulation, provide estimates closer to the 'stylized fact' of 2% per annum convergence. A further conclusion is that the use of regional price deflators may affect rates of convergence estimates. Spatial autocorrelation suggests that growth 'hot spots' can influence surrounding areas positively, but that poor economic performance in lagging areas may also have wider regional impacts.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew Henley, 2005. "On regional growth convergence in Great Britain," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(9), pages 1245-1260.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:regstd:v:39:y:2005:i:9:p:1245-1260
    DOI: 10.1080/00343400500390123
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. James Simmie, 2010. "The Information Economy and its Spatial Evolution in English Cities," Chapters,in: The Handbook of Evolutionary Economic Geography, chapter 23 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. repec:spr:empeco:v:52:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s00181-016-1122-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Richard Harris, 2011. "Models Of Regional Growth: Past, Present And Future," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(5), pages 913-951, December.
    4. repec:rjr:romjef:v::y:2018:i:1:p:124-139 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Peter Gripaios & Paul Bishop, 2006. "Objective One Funding in the UK: A Critical Assessment," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(8), pages 937-951.
    6. Chun-Hung Lin & Suchandra Lahiri & Ching-Po Hsu, 2015. "Population Aging and Regional Income Inequality in Taiwan: A Spatial Dimension," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 122(3), pages 757-777, July.
    7. Paul Bishop & Peter Gripaios, 2005. "Patterns Of Persistence And Mobility In Gdp Per Head Across Gb Counties," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 96(5), pages 529-540, December.
    8. Ryohei Nakamura & Masahiro Taguchi, 2011. "Agglomeration and Institutional Effects on Dynamics in Regional Disparities: Experience from Poland and Japan," Ekonomia journal, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, vol. 25.
    9. Sibel Balı Eryiğit & Kadir Yasin Eryiğit & Ercan Dülgeroğlu, 2015. "Local Financial Development and Capital Accumulations: Evidence from Turkey," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 62(3), pages 339-360, June.
    10. Paul Bishop & Peter Gripaios, 2006. "Earnings convergence in UK counties: a distribution dynamics approach," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 29-33.
    11. Bluszcz Anna, 2016. "Classification of the European Union member states according to the relative level of sustainable development," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(6), pages 2591-2605, November.
    12. Paul Bishop, 2008. "Diversity and employment growth in sub-regions of Great Britain," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(14), pages 1105-1109.
    13. Mahmut ERDOGAN & Jülide YILDIRIM & Nadir ÖCAL, "undated". "Financial Development and Economic Growth in Turkey: a Spatial Effect Analysis," EcoMod2008 23800034, EcoMod.
    14. Cinzia Rienzo, 2017. "Real wages, wage inequality and the regional cost-of-living in the UK," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 52(4), pages 1309-1335, June.
    15. Rodrigo Mendieta Muñoz & Nicola Pontarollo, 2016. "Territorial Growth in Ecuador: The Role of Economic Sectors," JRC Working Papers JRC103628, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic growth; Convergence; Great Britain counties; Croissance economique; Convergence; Comtes de Grande-Bretagne; Wirtschaftswachstum; Konvergenz; Grafschaften des UK; Crecimiento economico; Convergencia; Condados de GB; JEL classifications: O0; R11; R12;

    JEL classification:

    • O0 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - General
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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