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Foreign direct investment, financial development, and economic growth: the case of Malaysia

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  • Chee-Keong Choong
  • Kian-Ping Lim

Abstract

This paper presents, within an endogenous growth model, an analysis of the interaction between foreign direct investment (FDI) and financial development in promoting Malaysia's economic growth. Using a co-integration framework, this study estimates a dynamic endogenous growth function that includes the impact of FDI and financial sector evolution as well as some locational determinants for the sample period spanning from 1970 to 2001. The empirical evidence suggests that foreign direct investment, labour, investment, and government expenditure play a pivotal role in local economic prosperity. More importantly, it is found that the interaction between FDI and financial development exerts a significant effect on the growth performance of Malaysia. Perhaps the strongest result to emerge from our study is the significant role played by FDI-finance interaction in the growth process.

Suggested Citation

  • Chee-Keong Choong & Kian-Ping Lim, 2009. "Foreign direct investment, financial development, and economic growth: the case of Malaysia," Macroeconomics and Finance in Emerging Market Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(1), pages 13-30.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:macfem:v:2:y:2009:i:1:p:13-30
    DOI: 10.1080/17520840902726227
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. L.R. de Mello Jr., 1996. "Foreign Direct Investment, International Knowledge Transfers, and Endogenous Growth: Time Series Evidence," Studies in Economics 9610, School of Economics, University of Kent.
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    Cited by:

    1. Shahbaz, Muhammad, 2012. "Does trade openness affect long run growth? Cointegration, causality and forecast error variance decomposition tests for Pakistan," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 2325-2339.
    2. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Mohammad, Mafizur Rahman, 2014. "The Dynamics of Exports, Financial Development and Economic Growth in Pakistan: New Extensions from Cointegration and Causality Analysis," MPRA Paper 53225, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 19 Jan 2014.
    3. Muhammad Shahbaz & Mohammad Mafizur Rahman, 2012. "The Dynamic of Financial Development, Imports, Foreign Direct Investment and Economic Growth: Cointegration and Causality Analysis in Pakistan," Global Business Review, International Management Institute, vol. 13(2), pages 201-219, June.

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