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Labour Demand and Wage-induced Innovations: Evidence from the OECD countries

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  • Jakob Madsen
  • Richard Damania

Abstract

This paper shows that increasing real wages steepens or reverses the slope of the labour demand schedule because increasing wages give firms incentives to innovate and to invest in newer and more efficient vintages of capital. Using macroeconomic data for the OECD countries it is shown that the efficiency inducement of higher real wages steepens the traditional neoclassical labour demand function substantially. Taking into account the adverse demand effects of wage reductions it is doubtful that real wage reductions are a cure for the unemployment problem in the OECD countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Jakob Madsen & Richard Damania, 2001. "Labour Demand and Wage-induced Innovations: Evidence from the OECD countries," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 323-334.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:irapec:v:15:y:2001:i:3:p:323-334
    DOI: 10.1080/02692170110052365
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Olivier Jean Blanchard, 1988. "Unemployment: Getting the Questions Right--and Some of the Answers," Working papers 502, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
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    5. Downing, Paul B. & White, Lawrence J., 1986. "Innovation in pollution control," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 18-29, March.
    6. Madsen, Jakob B, 1998. "General Equilibrium Macroeconomic Models of Unemployment: Can They Explain the Unemployment Path in the OECD?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(448), pages 850-867, May.
    7. Bean, Charles R, 1994. "European Unemployment: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(2), pages 573-619, June.
    8. Alan Manning, 1995. "How Do We Know That Real Wages Are Too High?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 1111-1125.
    9. Clark, Gregory, 1987. "Why Isn't the Whole World Developed? Lessons from the Cotton Mills," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 47(01), pages 141-173, March.
    10. Keith A. Bender & Ioannis Theodossiou, 1999. "International Comparisons of the Real Wage—Employment Relationship," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(4), pages 621-637, July.
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    12. Chennells, Lucy & Van Reenen, John, 1997. "Technical Change and Earnings in British Establishments," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 64(256), pages 587-604, November.
    13. Milliman, Scott R. & Prince, Raymond, 1989. "Firm incentives to promote technological change in pollution control," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 247-265, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Abbas Valadkhani, 2003. "An Empirical Analysis of Australian Labour Productivity," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(3), pages 273-291, September.
    2. Tim Bulman & John Simon, 2003. "Productivity and Inflation," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2003-10, Reserve Bank of Australia.

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