IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/ecinnt/v26y2017i1-2p168-182.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

CDM using a cross-country micro moments database

Author

Listed:
  • Eric Bartelsman
  • George van Leeuwen
  • Michael Polder

Abstract

This note starts with a retrospective view of the CDM model [Crépon, Bruno, Emmanuel Duguet, and Jacques Mairesse. 1998. “Research, Innovation and Productivity: An Econometric Analysis at the Firm Level.” Economics of Innovation and New Technology 7 (2): 115–158.] as an econometric framework for studying innovation and growth. A narrative interpretation of CDM describes the chain from innovative activity at firms to increases in welfare and makes links to the policy environment. Filling in missing pieces of the innovation to productivity puzzle has a heavy data burden. The paper makes use of the micro moments database (MMD) that allows observing micro-level behavior and macro-level impacts of innovation and production in a large selection of European countries. Two examples are given of research using the MMD. First, we estimate a simplified system of innovation and production equations that can be applied to average firm choices and outcomes, as well as to industry or aggregate outcomes. We find that innovative activity contributes to aggregate productivity even while the average effect at the firm level is insignificant. Next, a cross-country exploration is made that shows heightened productivity effects of combined use by firms of various enterprise-level information and communications technologies.

Suggested Citation

  • Eric Bartelsman & George van Leeuwen & Michael Polder, 2017. "CDM using a cross-country micro moments database," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(1-2), pages 168-182, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:ecinnt:v:26:y:2017:i:1-2:p:168-182
    DOI: 10.1080/10438599.2016.1202517
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/10438599.2016.1202517
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ralf Martin, 2005. "Productivity Dispersion, Competition and Productivity Measurement," CEP Discussion Papers dp0692, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    2. Daron Acemoglu & Ufuk Akcigit & Harun Alp & Nicholas Bloom & William Kerr, 2018. "Innovation, Reallocation, and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 108(11), pages 3450-3491, November.
    3. Polder, Michael & Leeuwen, George van & Mohnen, Pierre & Raymond, Wladimir, 2010. "Product, process and organizational innovation: drivers, complementarity and productivity effects," MERIT Working Papers 2010-035, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ugur, Mehment & Vivarelli, Marco, 2020. "The role of innovation in industrial dynamics and productivity growth: a survey of the literature," GLO Discussion Paper Series 648, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    2. Pierre Mohnen & Michael Polder & George van Leeuwen, 2019. "ICT, R&D, and Organizational Innovation: Exploring Complementarities in Investment and Production," NBER Chapters, in: Measuring and Accounting for Innovation in the Twenty-First Century, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Ugur, Mehmet & Vivarelli, Marco, 2020. "Innovation, firm survival and productivity: The state of the art," Greenwich Papers in Political Economy 28308, University of Greenwich, Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre.
    4. Nicoletti, Giuseppe & von Rueden, Christina & Andrews, Dan, 2020. "Digital technology diffusion: A matter of capabilities, incentives or both?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 128(C).
    5. Schubert, Torben & Jäger, Angela & Türkeli, Serdar & Visentin, Fabiana, 2020. "Addressing the productivity paradox with big data: A literature review and adaptation of the CDM econometric model," MERIT Working Papers 2020-050, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    6. Mehmet Ugur & Marco Vivarelli, 2020. "Technology, industrial dynamics and productivity: a critical survey," DISCE - Quaderni del Dipartimento di Politica Economica dipe0011, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
    7. Eric J. Bartelsman & Martin Falk & Eva Hagsten & Michael Polder, 2019. "Productivity, technological innovations and broadband connectivity: firm-level evidence for ten European countries," Eurasian Business Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 9(1), pages 25-48, March.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:ecinnt:v:26:y:2017:i:1-2:p:168-182. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/GEIN20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.