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A dynamic econometric model of Thailand manufacturing energy demand

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  • Suthep Buranakunaporn
  • Edward Oczkowski

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to employ the dynamic translog framework to model inter-factor and inter-fuel energy demand for the Thai manufacturing sector. The Denny et al. (1981) and Lynk (1989) framework, which proposes a dynamic adjustment for capital stock is employed to motivate the estimated of factor demand and fuel share equations. Three factors: energy, labour and capital; and five fuel types: fuel oil, diesel oil, liquified petroleum gas (LPG), electricity, and coal and lignite; are examined. Regression diagnostics support the empirical specification. Numerous factor and fuel substitution possibilities are identified, with some policy implications described.

Suggested Citation

  • Suthep Buranakunaporn & Edward Oczkowski, 2007. "A dynamic econometric model of Thailand manufacturing energy demand," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(17), pages 2261-2267.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:39:y:2007:i:17:p:2261-2267
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840600707167
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Urga, Giovanni & Walters, Chris, 2003. "Dynamic translog and linear logit models: a factor demand analysis of interfuel substitution in US industrial energy demand," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 1-21, January.
    2. Magnus, J.R. & Woodland, A.D., 1987. "Inter-fuel substitution in Dutch manufacturing," Other publications TiSEM ac70331b-1a1e-465e-9ccc-8, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
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    Cited by:

    1. David I. Stern, 2012. "Interfuel Substitution: A Meta‐Analysis," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(2), pages 307-331, April.
    2. Bhattacharyya, Subhes C. & Timilsina, Govinda R., 2010. "Modelling energy demand of developing countries: Are the specific features adequately captured?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 1979-1990, April.

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