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The effect of regime shifts on the long-run relationships for Swedish money demand

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  • R. Scott Hacker
  • Abdulnasser Hatemi-J

Abstract

When the possibility of an unknown structural break is allowed and it is taken into account we find a significant long-run relationship between Swedish money demand and its determinants that is not found when no break is considered. The estimated elasticities show that money demand is more responsive to its determinants in the period after the break than before. Possible underlying reasons for the occurrence of this break and its implications are explained.

Suggested Citation

  • R. Scott Hacker & Abdulnasser Hatemi-J, 2005. "The effect of regime shifts on the long-run relationships for Swedish money demand," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(15), pages 1731-1736.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:37:y:2005:i:15:p:1731-1736
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840500215444
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Miller, Stephen M, 1991. "Monetary Dynamics: An Application of Cointegration and Error-Correction Modeling," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 23(2), pages 139-154, May.
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    3. Samuel Andoh & David Chappell, 2002. "Stability of the money demand function: evidence from Ghana," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(13), pages 875-878.
    4. Banerjee, Anindya & Lumsdaine, Robin L & Stock, James H, 1992. "Recursive and Sequential Tests of the Unit-Root and Trend-Break Hypotheses: Theory and International Evidence," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 10(3), pages 271-287, July.
    5. Vasco De & A. Gabriel & Artur C. B. Da Silva Lopes & Luis Nunes, 2003. "Instability in cointegration regressions: a brief review with an application to money demand in Portugal," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(8), pages 893-900.
    6. Gregory, Allan W. & Hansen, Bruce E., 1996. "Residual-based tests for cointegration in models with regime shifts," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 99-126, January.
    7. Newey, Whitney & West, Kenneth, 2014. "A simple, positive semi-definite, heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation consistent covariance matrix," Applied Econometrics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), vol. 33(1), pages 125-132.
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