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Money and monetization in China's economic reform

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  • Kui-Wai Li

Abstract

In addition to privatization marketization, liberalization and pragmatization, monetization has been argued as the fifth feature in china's economic reform. If monetization is taken to mean a process through which variations in money supply or interest rate are to affect macroeconomic variables, the construction of four causality relationships between interest rate and investment, and money and national income do not support the evidence of such a process in China between the late 1970s and early 1990s.

Suggested Citation

  • Kui-Wai Li, 1997. "Money and monetization in China's economic reform," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(9), pages 1139-1146.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:29:y:1997:i:9:p:1139-1146 DOI: 10.1080/00036849700000004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Liu, Tung & Li, Kui-Wai, 2006. "Disparity in factor contributions between coastal and inner provinces in post-reform China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 449-470.
    2. Kim, Byung-Yeon & Pirttila, Jukka, 2004. "Money, barter, and inflation in Russia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, pages 297-314.
    3. Ahmed, Abdullahi D., 2013. "Effects of financial liberalization on financial market development and economic performance of the SSA region: An empirical assessment," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 261-273.
    4. repec:ucm:wpaper:05-09 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Dimitrios Koumparoulis, 2013. "Laboratory Experimentation in Economics Classification-JEL: C90, C91, C92," Journal of Knowledge Management, Economics and Information Technology, ScientificPapers.org, vol. 3(1), pages 1-1, February.
    6. A. C. Arize & Malindretos John, 2000. "Does Inflation Variability Affect the Demand for Money in China? Evidence from Error-Correction Models," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 47-60.
    7. Vicente Donoso & Víctor Martín, 2009. "Exportaciones y crecimiento económico: estudios empíricos," Working Papers del Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales 0905, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales.

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