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Does government growth reduce precautionary saving?


  • Dimitris Hatzinikolaou


The paper extends the constant-relative-risk-aversion model by endogenizing the Arrow-Pratt coefficient of relative risk aversion. The empirical application treats this coefficient as a linear function of the rate of growth of real government expenditure per worker and estimates a Euler equation for consumption using Greek annual aggregate data for the period 1960-1993. The results support the view that government growth may cause a typical consumer to become less risk averse and save less.

Suggested Citation

  • Dimitris Hatzinikolaou, 1997. "Does government growth reduce precautionary saving?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(4), pages 419-423.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:29:y:1997:i:4:p:419-423
    DOI: 10.1080/000368497326912

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Amjad, Rashid, 1984. "The management of Pakistan's economy 1947-82," MPRA Paper 35850, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Amjad, Rashid, 1987. "Human resource development: the Asian experience in employment and manpower planning - an overview," MPRA Paper 38135, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yamamura, Eiji, 2014. "Time preference and perceptions about government spending and tax: Smokers’ dependence on government support," MPRA Paper 55659, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Konstantinos Angelopoulos & Apostolis Philippopoulos, 2007. "The growth effects of fiscal policy in Greece 1960–2000," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 131(1), pages 157-175, April.

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