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Equity style timing using support vector regressions


  • Georgi Nalbantov
  • Rob Bauer
  • Ida Sprinkhuizen-Kuyper


The disappointing performance of value and small cap strategies shows that style consistency may not provide the long-term benefits often assumed in the literature. In this study it is examined whether the short-term variation in the US size and value premium is predictable. Style-timing strategies are documented based on technical and (macro-) economic predictors using a recently developed artificial intelligence tool called Support Vector Regressions (SVR). SVR are known for their ability to tackle the standard problem of overfitting, especially in multivariate settings. The findings indicate that both premiums are predictable under fair levels of transaction costs and various forecasting horizons.

Suggested Citation

  • Georgi Nalbantov & Rob Bauer & Ida Sprinkhuizen-Kuyper, 2006. "Equity style timing using support vector regressions," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(15), pages 1095-1111.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apfiec:v:16:y:2006:i:15:p:1095-1111 DOI: 10.1080/09603100500426556

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Pesaran, M Hashem & Timmermann, Allan, 1995. " Predictability of Stock Returns: Robustness and Economic Significance," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 50(4), pages 1201-1228, September.
    7. Bauer, Rob & Derwall, Jeroen & Molenaar, Roderick, 2004. "The real-time predictability of the size and value premium in Japan," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 12(5), pages 503-523, November.
    8. Ki-Yeol Kwon & Richard Kish, 2002. "Technical trading strategies and return predictability: NYSE," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(9), pages 639-653.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thorsten Hock, 2010. "Tactical Size Rotation in Switzerland," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 146(III), pages 553-576, September.
    2. Kathryn Holmes & Robert Faff & Iain Clacher, 2010. "Style analysis and dominant index timing: an application to Australian multi-sector managed funds," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(4), pages 293-301.

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