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Which level of schooling has the greatest economic impact on output?

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  • Stephen Knowles

Abstract

An assessment is made of whether primary, secondary or tertiary education has the greatest impact on national income. An aggregate production function is estimated for a cross-section of 77 countries which disaggregates the labour force on the basis of the highest level of schooling attained. The results imply that for both high-income and less developed countries the marginal product of labour increases with each successive level of schooling. Tertiary education has the greatest economic impact.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Knowles, 1997. "Which level of schooling has the greatest economic impact on output?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(3), pages 177-180.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:4:y:1997:i:3:p:177-180
    DOI: 10.1080/135048597355465
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Barro, Robert J. & Lee, Jong-Wha, 1993. "International comparisons of educational attainment," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 363-394, December.
    2. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-437.
    3. Benhabib, Jess & Spiegel, Mark M., 1994. "The role of human capital in economic development evidence from aggregate cross-country data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 143-173, October.
    4. Gemmell, Norman, 1995. "Endogenous Growth, the Solow Model and Human Capital," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 28(2-3), pages 169-183.
    5. Malcolm Knight & Norman Loayza & Delano Villanueva, 1993. "Testing the Neoclassical Theory of Economic Growth: A Panel Data Approach," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 40(3), pages 512-541, September.
    6. Alan M. Taylor, 1995. "Growth and Convergence in the Asia-Pacific Region: On the Role of Openness, Trade and Migration," NBER Working Papers 5276, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Samuel Perlo‐Freeman & Don J. Webber, 2009. "Basic Needs, Government Debt and Economic Growth," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(6), pages 965-994, June.
    2. Azmat Gani & Michael D. Clemes, 2010. "Services and economic growth in Pacific Island countries," International Journal of Development Issues, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 9(2), pages 113-130, July.
    3. Chun-Li Tsai & Ming-Cheng Hung & Kevin Harriott, 2010. "Human Capital Composition and Economic Growth," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 99(1), pages 41-59, October.

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