IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

About the stability of the inventory-sales ratio: an empirical study with US sectoral data


  • Melika Ben Salem
  • Jean-Francois Jacques


The behaviour of one of the most important inventory indicators is highlighted. The investigation concerns US sectoral post-war data. It appears that a decline in the ratio for manufacturing, when observed, is partially offset by an increasing inventory-sales ratio in the trade sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Melika Ben Salem & Jean-Francois Jacques, 1996. "About the stability of the inventory-sales ratio: an empirical study with US sectoral data," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(7), pages 467-469.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:3:y:1996:i:7:p:467-469 DOI: 10.1080/758540808

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gary S. Becker, 1962. "Investment in Human Capital: A Theoretical Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70, pages 1-9.
    2. Jim Millington, 1995. "Age and inter-county net migration in Great Britain," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(4), pages 107-109.
    3. Moffitt, Robert & Wolfe, Barbara L, 1992. "The Effect of the Medicaid Program on Welfare Participation and Labor Supply," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(4), pages 615-626, November.
    4. Edward M. Gramlich & Deborah S. Laren, 1984. "Migration and Income Redistribution Responsibilities," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 19(4), pages 489-511.
    5. Treyz, George I, et al, 1993. "The Dynamics of U.S. Internal Migration," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 75(2), pages 209-214, May.
    6. Herzog, Henry W, Jr & Hofler, Richard A & Schlottmann, Alan M, 1985. "Life on the Frontier: Migrant Information, Earnings and Past Mobility," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(3), pages 373-382, August.
    7. Henry W. Herzog Jr. & Alan M. Schlottmann, 1984. "Labor Force Mobility in the United States: Migration, Unemployment, and Remigration," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 9(1), pages 43-58, September.
    8. Greenwood, Michael J, 1975. "Research on Internal Migration in the United States: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 397-433, June.
    9. Cebula, Richard J, 1990. "A Brief Empirical Note on the Tiebout Hypothesis and State Income Tax Policies," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 67(1), pages 87-89, October.
    10. Schlottmann, Alan M & Herzog, Henry W, Jr, 1981. "Employment Status and the Decision to Migrate," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 63(4), pages 590-598, November.
    11. Molho, Ian, 1986. "Theories of Migration: A Review," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 33(4), pages 396-419, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Elias Sanidas, 2014. "How SMEs or larger firms and industries’ productivity respond to technology: a panel data study," SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, University of Piraeus, vol. 64(1), pages 16-28, January-M.
    2. Paula R. Worthington, 1998. "Inventories and output volatility," Working Paper Series WP-98-21, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:3:y:1996:i:7:p:467-469. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.