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Excess sensitivity of consumption, liquidity constraints, and mandatory saving

  • Cheolbeom Park
  • Pei Fang Lim

Using Singapore mandatory saving system, it is examined whether liquidity constraint is a major reason for the excess-sensitivity of consumption to predictable income growth. Although the mandatory saving rate for employees could be a good measure for the financial condition of a liquidity-constrained consumer, it is found, through the nonlinear instrumental variable estimation, that consumption growth is not sensitive to changes in the mandatory saving rate for employees. This finding suggests that liquidity constraints would not be a major reason for the excess-sensitivity puzzle.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 11 (2004)
Issue (Month): 12 ()
Pages: 771-774

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Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:11:y:2004:i:12:p:771-774
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  1. John Y. Campbell & N. Gregory Mankiw, 1987. "Permanent Income, Current Income, and Consumption," NBER Working Papers 2436, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Tilak ABEYSINGHE & CHOY Keen Meng, 2002. "The Aggregate Consumption Puzzle In Singapore," Departmental Working Papers wp0213, National University of Singapore, Department of Economics.
  3. Philippe BACCHETTA & Stefan GERLACH, 1997. "Consumption and Credit Constraints : International Evidence," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 9707, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
  4. Attanasio, Orazio P & Weber, Guglielmo, 1993. "Consumption Growth, the Interest Rate and Aggregation," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(3), pages 631-49, July.
  5. Carroll, Christopher D & Fuhrer, Jeffrey C & Wilcox, David W, 1994. "Does Consumer Sentiment Forecast Household Spending? If So, Why?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1397-1408, December.
  6. John Y. Campbell & N. Gregory Mankiw, 1989. "Consumption, Income, and Interest Rates: Reinterpreting the Time Series Evidence," NBER Working Papers 2924, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Campbell, John Y. & Mankiw, N. Gregory, 1991. "The response of consumption to income : A cross-country investigation," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 723-756, May.
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