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Balancing Work and Family: A Panel Analysis of the Impact of Part-Time Work on the Experience of Time Pressure

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  • Ilse Laurijssen

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  • Ignace Glorieux

Abstract

In this article we consider the consequences of work-family reconciliation, in terms of the extent to which the adjustment of the labour market career to family demands (by women) contributes to a better work-life balance. Using the Flemish SONAR-data, we analyse how changes in work and family conditions between the age of 26 and 29 are related to changes in feelings of time pressure among young working women. More specifically, by using cross-lagged models and synchronous effects panel models, we analyse (1) how family and work conditions affect feelings of time pressure, as well as (2) reverse effects which may point to (working career) adjustment strategies of coping with time pressure. Our results show that of all the considered changes in working conditions following family formation (i.e. having children), only the reduction of working hours seems to improve work-family balance (i.e. reduces the experience of time pressure). Part-time work is both a response to high time pressure, and effectively lowers time pressure. The effect of part-time work is not affected by concomitant changes in the type of paid work, rather, work characteristics that increase time pressure increase the probability of reconciling work with family life by reducing the number of work hours. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Ilse Laurijssen & Ignace Glorieux, 2013. "Balancing Work and Family: A Panel Analysis of the Impact of Part-Time Work on the Experience of Time Pressure," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 112(1), pages 1-17, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:112:y:2013:i:1:p:1-17
    DOI: 10.1007/s11205-012-0046-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Duncan Gallie & Helen Russell, 2009. "Work-Family Conflict and Working Conditions in Western Europe," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 93(3), pages 445-467, September.
    2. Eva M. Berger, 2009. "Maternal Employment and Happiness: The Effect of Non-Participation and Part-Time Employment on Mothers' Life Satisfaction," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 890, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Vanessa Gash & Antje Mertens & Laura Romeu Gordo, 2010. "Women between Part-Time and Full-Time Work: The Influence of Changing Hours of Work on Happiness and Life-Satisfaction," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 268, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    4. Green, Francis & McIntosh, Steven, 2001. "The intensification of work in Europe," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 291-308, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Malbon Eleanor & Carey Dr. Gemma, 2017. "Implications of work time flexibility for health promoting behaviours," Evidence Base, Australia and New Zealand School of Government, vol. 2017(4), pages 1-17, December.
    2. Niels-Hugo Blunch & David C. Ribar & Mark Western, 2020. "Under pressure? Assessing the roles of skills and other personal resources for work-life strains," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 18(3), pages 883-906, September.
    3. Dong-Jin Lee & M. Joseph Sirgy, 2018. "What Do People Do to Achieve Work–Life Balance? A Formative Conceptualization to Help Develop a Metric for Large-Scale Quality-of-Life Surveys," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 138(2), pages 771-791, July.
    4. Jesper Rözer & Gerald Mollenhorst & Anne-Rigt Poortman, 2016. "Family and Friends: Which Types of Personal Relationships Go Together in a Network?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 127(2), pages 809-826, June.
    5. El¿bieta Robak & Anna S³ociñska, 2015. "Work – Life Balance And The Management Of Social Work Environment," Polish Journal of Management Studies, Czestochowa Technical University, Department of Management, vol. 11(2), pages 138-148, June.
    6. Blunch, Niels-Hugo & Ribar, David & Western, Mark, 2018. "Under Pressure? Assessing the Roles of Skills and Other Personal Resources for Work-Life Strains," GLO Discussion Paper Series 292, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    7. Jarrod M. Haar & Albert Sune & Marcello Russo & Ariane Ollier-Malaterre, 2019. "A Cross-National Study on the Antecedents of Work–Life Balance from the Fit and Balance Perspective," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 142(1), pages 261-282, February.
    8. Blunch, Niels-Hugo & Ribar, David C. & Western, Mark, 2018. "Under Pressure? Assessing the Roles of Skills and Other Personal Resources for Work-Life Strains," IZA Discussion Papers 12055, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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