IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Attitudes to Chronic Poverty in the ‘Global Village’

  • Armando Barrientos


  • Daniel Neff

The paper explores attitudes to chronic poverty in a cross-section of developed and developing countries based on data from the World Values Survey Wave Three (1994-1998). The analysis finds a consistent belief among a majority of respondents that poverty is chronic. This paper also explores the factors that influence public attitudes to chronic poverty and finds that interests, position, knowledge, and shared values relating to social justice are important.

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by Springer in its journal Social Indicators Research.

Volume (Year): 100 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 101-114

in new window

Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:100:y:2011:i:1:p:101-114
Contact details of provider: Web page:

Order Information: Web:

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Dirk Kohner, 2010. "Democratization via Elections in an African “Narco-state”? The Case of Guinea-Bissau," GIGA Working Paper Series 123, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
  2. Hayati, Dariush & Karami, Ezatollah, 2005. "Typology of causes of poverty: The perception of Iranian farmers," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 884-901, December.
  3. Mark Gradstein & Alberto E. Chong, 2006. "Who's Afraid of Foreign Aid?: The Donors' Perspective," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 6706, Inter-American Development Bank.
  4. Federica Misturelli & Claire Heffernan, 2001. "Perceptions of poverty among poor livestock keepers in Kenya: a discourse analysis approach," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(7), pages 863-875.
  5. Angeletos, George-Marios & Alesina, Alberto, 2005. "Fairness and Redistribution," Scholarly Articles 4553009, Harvard University Department of Economics.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:100:y:2011:i:1:p:101-114. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla)

or (Christopher F Baum)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.