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The effect of holding a research chair on scientists’ productivity

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  • Seyed Reza Mirnezami

    () (Polytechnique Montreal)

  • Catherine Beaudry

    () (Polytechnique Montreal)

Abstract

Abstract Having combined data on Quebec scientists’ funding and journal publication, this paper tests the effect of holding a research chair on a scientist’s performance. The novelty of this paper is to use a matching technique to understand whether holding a research chair contributes to a better scientific performance. This method compares two different sets of regressions which are conducted on different data sets: one with all observations and another with only the observations of the matched scientists. Two chair and non-chair scientists are deemed matched with each other when they have the closest propensity score in terms of gender, research field, and amount of funding. The results show that holding a research chair is a significant scientific productivity determinant in the complete data set. However, when only matched scientists are kept in data set, holding a Canada research chair has a significant positive effect on scientific performance but other types of chairs do not have a significant effect. In the other words, in the case of two similar scientists in terms of gender, research funding, and research field, only holding a Canada research chair significantly affects scientific performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Seyed Reza Mirnezami & Catherine Beaudry, 2016. "The effect of holding a research chair on scientists’ productivity," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 107(2), pages 399-454, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:scient:v:107:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s11192-016-1848-y
    DOI: 10.1007/s11192-016-1848-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

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